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Old 15 January 2007, 11:17   #1
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Trailer: single or twin axle

Which is preferable for a boat of about 7m, assuming both are rated for the same weight. Is a twin going to be more stable whilst towing? Is a single going to be easier to tow?

Comments please.....

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Old 15 January 2007, 11:22   #2
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Extra security wins every time. A single axle trailer is easier to man handle around in tight spots but if you are towing any sort of distance it's no contest.

For me the extra security of a triple axle will be the way to go - the stability is awesome but maybe overkill even for my 9m!!!
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Old 15 January 2007, 11:31   #3
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Will the twin be more stable though (ie less likley to snake/wobble around). Presumably it will bounce less than a single?

I would also assume a twin axle (if set up right) will be kinder on the car. Ie if u go over a bump presumably there is quite a loss of force being applied to your towbar. Does a second axle help to balance the trailer in such a case and counteract that somewhat (leading perhaps to a more comfortable journey for the people in the car?).

I have very limited experiance of twin axle trailers, but on the few occastions I have towed them (normally flatbeds) they have seemed a lot less bouncy then ones with a single axle....
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Old 15 January 2007, 11:33   #4
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Have to agree with Codders, having just changed from a single to a twin axle!
I could wheel around the single no problem on a hard level surface, but now it is a hell of a job to maneuver by hand with the twin!
If I should have a blow out then I have anther wheel B4 it all goes pair shape!
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Old 15 January 2007, 11:44   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim M View Post
Will the twin be more stable though (ie less likley to snake/wobble around). Presumably it will bounce less than a single?

I would also assume a twin axle (if set up right) will be kinder on the car. Ie if u go over a bump presumably there is quite a loss of force being applied to your towbar. Does a second axle help to balance the trailer in such a case and counteract that somewhat (leading perhaps to a more comfortable journey for the people in the car?).

I have very limited experiance of twin axle trailers, but on the few occastions I have towed them (normally flatbeds) they have seemed a lot less bouncy then ones with a single axle....
Technically the bounce has nothing to do with the number of axles - it's down to the weight and suspension setup.

You should get more stability with a twin and also better braking. The 3 axle trailer I used would stop my Discovery a treat - once I had started the breaking acion the trailer would do most of the work.

You are right about the the forces being less on the towbar but that is also down to balance. The more axles you have the less you need to worry.
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Old 15 January 2007, 11:56   #6
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Is a twin going to be more stable whilst towing? Is a single going to be easier to tow? Comments please.....
Yes, Yes, never mind that, what have you bought now ?

Pete
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Old 15 January 2007, 11:57   #7
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Tim

Having changed my trailer from single to twin axles I believe there is no contest. Twin axles all the way, far more stable under way, and I've not noticed much differance manouvering in tight spots.

However, I never move the boat around by hand when its on its trailer which would be more difficult.

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Old 15 January 2007, 12:12   #8
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Yes, Yes, never mind that, what have you bought now ?

Pete
Nothing (yet)

Sounds like a twin would be better then.
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Old 15 January 2007, 12:23   #9
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Looks like Iím in a minority of one then I much prefer towing with a well set up single axle trailer.

Safety argument - Safer if a tyre blows out ? Ok.. if itís well maintained what are the odds of a modern tyre blowing out ? The odds are just as great as blowing out one of the tyres on the steering axle of your towing vehicle and how many people worry about that?

A lot of the stability problems are down to poor weight distribution. With a multi-axle trailer you have to be lot more careful about not only nose weight, but also the height of your tow hitch.

Towing the 7m Humber on a single axle trailer was a breeze. It was well set up, used a suitable tow vehicle and was properly looked after and manoeuvring it in tight spaces was far less stressful on the tyres and nervesÖÖ
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Old 15 January 2007, 12:25   #10
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For 7m I'd look at a twin unless you will regularly be moving it by hand into a tight spot. (Even then you can make life easier by putting a bit more air into the tyres)

Mine's a twin and I managed to drive it a few miles on 3 wheels without any drama after one of the suspension units failed.

With 4 wheels sharing the load obviously less wear and tear on each bearing.
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