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Old 11 March 2012, 05:52   #11
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As a statement of the bleeding obvious, there's something not right here...in the second photograph the lower chassis rails look like they've been wrenched, torn and twisted, the uppers look like they're been laser cut they're so neat.

As there's no evidence of bolt holes through these upper rails I wonder what they were attached to and how? Surely, they're supposed to attach to something?

Need more facts, m'lud, more facts
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Old 11 March 2012, 05:55   #12
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Looks to me the bottom sections failed/snapped and the top ones have been cut to make it mobile again to aid recovery

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Old 11 March 2012, 05:58   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boats&Outboards View Post
Looks to me the bottom sections failed/snapped and the top ones have been cut to make it mobile again to aid recovery
Could be, Peter, but if that's the case it's a damn neat road side repair...
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Old 11 March 2012, 06:14   #14
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i have always thought that alloy was weaker unless you go for far larger sections or profiles
this trailer looks to be made from the same size as steel box section trailers
i would thererfore think that it was generaly weaker especially at the front end of a longer section.
i have always kept away from alloy trailers that are getting dipped in salt water as the corrosion would taske ahold quicker(i drive landrovers and know all about alloy corrosion!!)
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Old 11 March 2012, 06:18   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boats&Outboards View Post
Looks to me the bottom sections failed/snapped and the top ones have been cut to make it mobile again to aid recovery

Peter @ Boatsandoutboards4sale ~ askboatsandoutboards4sale@sky.com ~ 07930 421007
It may well be that that is where the top rails end and it was just the lower 2 rails that failed, there should be plastic end caps in those top rails, I'll have a look at my Gullwing later.
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Old 11 March 2012, 06:34   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AMac
i have always thought that alloy was weaker unless you go for far larger sections or profiles
this trailer looks to be made from the same size as steel box section trailers
i would thererfore think that it was generaly weaker especially at the front end of a longer section.
i have always kept away from alloy trailers that are getting dipped in salt water as the corrosion would taske ahold quicker(i drive landrovers and know all about alloy corrosion!!)
To be fair I did pull a boat back on one from Essex to Cornwall and it was a pleasure, other than the constant rattle we had they towed excellent. Accidents can happen and like others have said maybe the other side of the story would explain all.

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Old 11 March 2012, 06:34   #17
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Ahhh the joys of aluminium...

Unlike steel, aluminium has no elastic limit. This means that once you start flexing an aluminium profile, it starts to fatigue....even if the degree of the flexing is only be a minute amount the structure of the aluminium will be changing, and weakening.

Steel on the other hand can be bent back and forward an infinite number of times without detremental affect, so long as you dont bend the steel to the point of its elastic limit. ( pretty much the point where the steel stay's in its new 'bent' shape and doesnt spring back) then you will be fine.

In this case you never know what the trailer was carrying before this particular boat or even how it was loaded up in this example. If the drawbar was overloaded and subjected to a cyclic 'bouncing' effect then its inevitable that something was gonna give....at some point or another.

Aluminium can be an 'awkward' engineering material due to this phenomena and requires extra thought when used in the design of structures.

Now dont even get me started on those high speed aluminium cross channel catamaran's

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Old 11 March 2012, 06:49   #18
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Quote:
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i have always kept away from alloy trailers that are getting dipped in salt water as the corrosion would taske ahold quicker(i drive landrovers and know all about alloy corrosion!!)
Alloy or aluminium (ali)?

Aluminium in salt water is ok as the aluminium quickly develops a white protective oxide layer (unlike steel, which oxidises but it's non-protective). Aluminium corrosion in vehicles is most often the result of differential metal corrosion, and usually at a steel/aluminium junction. The sacrificial zinc anode on a boat/ship/yacht works in exactly the same way - the zinc is corroded (sacrificed) to protect the steel
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Old 11 March 2012, 10:07   #19
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Ex wife with a hacksaw?
Or current wife who wants the insurance, and her drive back!
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Old 11 March 2012, 12:42   #20
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Here are a couple more photos taken this afternoon. The first one shows the front of the trailer where it broke away. It looks to me like the weld has just failed. The second shows another weld on the rear swing beam, which also looks to have failed. There are several other split welds right down the trailer.
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