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Old 02 November 2012, 16:09   #31
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Hi Steve.
Quote:
folks here have a more liberal attitude to what constitutes a roadworthy trailer,
to be fair last time I saw 'em even the roads were unroadworthy outside of Stanley
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Old 02 November 2012, 16:56   #32
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Whoah! I have never seen mechanical trailer brakes before.

Drum brakes don't work well in reverse, but disks work so well it can stop you from backing uphill. Therefore the surge brakes use a solenoid for disks, along with a 5th wire on the trailer plug to cut them loose when in reverse. (Or you can put a pin in, but who wants to get out of the vehicle every time you want to back up?)
That's the problem Sir. Over here, the law states the trailer brakes have to be auto-reverse. i.e. you're not allowed to have ones that necessitate you having to get out and flick a lever, to stop them coming on when you're reversing.

The majority of braked trailers over here (likely 99%) have mechanical brakes. Very few run on hydraulic and even less on air.

I've some really good ideas for overcoming the obstacles, but to be able to be retro-fitted they need to be mechanical and utilise the existing trailer coupling.

I'd love to have access to the trailer equipment that's available in the states. We're a bit of a way behind in some respects.
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Old 02 November 2012, 19:26   #33
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Hi Steve.

to be fair last time I saw 'em even the roads were unroadworthy outside of Stanley
Nowt has changed
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Old 03 November 2012, 12:59   #34
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Thought you may appreciate an updated photo! Before and after

Resurrected - many more years now left in her and a site more safe. Well done to the new owner for doing the right thing

PS. Any 'brown stuff' on there now is coppa-slip, not rust!




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Old 04 November 2012, 11:57   #35
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Apparently the bearings had been renewed too.... no, honest guv...



Been a while since any brake shoes have seen these hub faces...





That's a bit better! Actual steel!...

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Old 05 November 2012, 11:36   #36
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Apparently the bearings had been renewed too.... no, honest guv...
They look fine to me. As long as it's a) not my trailer, and b) running on a different continent.

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Old 14 November 2012, 21:30   #37
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That's the problem Sir. Over here, the law states the trailer brakes have to be auto-reverse. i.e. you're not allowed to have ones that necessitate you having to get out and flick a lever, to stop them coming on when you're reversing.

The majority of braked trailers over here (likely 99%) have mechanical brakes. Very few run on hydraulic and even less on air..
I still have a UK made trailer with an old Bradley double lock hitch, that necessitates me having to get out and flip a locking lever over the drawtube to stop it brakling during reverse!
I recall reading somewhere that electro-hydraulic trailer brakes, widely used in the states, are illegal in the UK.
This is one of the main reasons why US made trailers dont exactly sell well over here, as well as their dimensions often being illegally too large.
Those that do manage to make the trip over to this side of the pond almost always have to modified in some fashion to make them road legal here.
That usually means replacing the US axle and hitch with UK/Euro legal versions, and occasionally reducing their dimensions so they meet UK trailer size regs.

Quote:
I've some really good ideas for overcoming the obstacles, but to be able to be retro-fitted they need to be mechanical and utilise the existing trailer coupling..
The easiest solution would be to lock the drawtube in position when reversing rather than trying to fabricate some complicated mechanism to allow the discs to unlock while reversing.
This can easily be achieved by using a hitch mounted solonoid powered by the reverse light circuit to automatically shoot a bolt out into a hole drilled in the drawtube to stop it sliding back during reversing, or to activate some simple lever mechansim that would do the same job.
The solonoid would only work when reverse is selected and it would automatically unlock when taken out of reverse.
Of course the exact implementation will need some carefull thought but I cant think of any reason why this would not meet existing UK trailer regs. If you can, let me know.
The Solonoid from an old starter motor would be a good choice and it should be very cheap and easy to obtain, then its just working out the best method to lock, and unlock the drawtube automatically as reliably as possible.

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I would love to have access to the trailer equipment that's available in the states. We're a bit of a way behind in some respects.
I dont. Apart from their braking mechanisms I think you will find that the yanks are actually years behind us, trailer design wise. Most of them still use bunks for petes sake!
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Old 15 November 2012, 00:09   #38
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The easiest solution would be to lock the drawtube in position when reversing rather than trying to fabricate some complicated mechanism to allow the discs to unlock while reversing.
This can easily be achieved by using a hitch mounted solonoid powered by the reverse light circuit to automatically shoot a bolt out into a hole drilled in the drawtube to stop it sliding back during reversing, or to activate some simple lever mechansim that would do the same job.
The solonoid would only work when reverse is selected and it would automatically unlock when taken out of reverse.
Here in the USA we do exactly that using the reverse backup lights to control the solenoid that cuts the hydraulic disk brakes loose

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I dont. Apart from their braking mechanisms I think you will find that the yanks are actually years behind us, trailer design wise. Most of them still use bunks for petes sake!
Depends on the boat. The RIB I used to ride on had rollers
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Old 15 November 2012, 01:05   #39
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Jeepster; Roller trailers are not necessarily an advantage. Assuming you have a known slip (your term; we call it a ramp), and a decently designed one, bunk trailers work fine. You can drive (or pull) the boat onto the bunks, and it stays there long enough to get out and secure the boat in place. Pull the rig forward a couple of feet, and you've got capture. Boat is on the trailer and secure. No issues with the boat prematurely leaving the trailer as your backing down, either (unless you're really aggressive.)

As I said in another post, there's more than one way to skin a cat. (Let's see if I get slapped up for this one...)

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