Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 10 July 2011, 15:29   #1
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
So my safety chains work!

Well something went wrong with my "hitching boat to car" procedure today. I'm not sure what as I'm certain I checked it was properly coupled but shortly after driving off the trailer came off the car. Fortunately the beefy safety chains did their job and allowed me to bring the car and trailer both to a relatively controlled stop with no damage to the trailer or boat . Unfortunately, but not unexpectedly the bumper on the car isn't looking too pretty - it has a gash about an inch and half wide in it and is deformed around this. Anyone know what the practical/cost limits are which mean "repair" is no longer as economical as replacement? I'm guessing this will be one of those times when the excess and potential insurance premium cost outweigh a claim.

I'm not certain what caused the issue and will need to do some more investigating. Almost certainly part of the problem was rainwater collected in the boat overnight which shifted to the back in transit unweighting the nose (learning point there about draining it properly before driving off )
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 July 2011, 15:44   #2
RIBnet admin team
 
Nos4r2's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: The wilds of Wiltshire
Boat name: WhiteNoise/Dominator
Make: Ballistic 7.8/SR5.4
Length: 7m +
Engine: Opti 225/Yam 85
MMSI: 235090687/235055163
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 12,645
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart View Post

I'm not certain what caused the issue and will need to do some more investigating. Almost certainly part of the problem was rainwater collected in the boat overnight which shifted to the back in transit unweighting the nose (learning point there about draining it properly before driving off )

Lucky escape!

I can tell you for <edit-ALMOST-unless your towball is REALLY badly worn!>certain that the issue was that it wasn't locked to the towball properly. I'd be looking closely at your hitch for wear-depending on the hitch type it should have withstood being lifted almost enough to lift the car by.

Rainwater wouldn't have been a factor-a good bump would have done it if the rainwater could do it.
__________________
Need spares,consoles,consumables,hire,training or even a new boat?

Please click HERE and HERE and support our Trade Members.

Join up as a Trade member or Supporter HERE
Nos4r2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 July 2011, 16:22   #3
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nos4r2 View Post
I can tell you for certain that the issue was that it wasn't locked to the towball properly. I'd be looking closely at your hitch for wear-depending on the hitch type it should have withstood being lifted almost enough to lift the car by.
Indeed - that is why I posted - I thought I was pretty thorough at checking the connection was good. I always try to lift the trailer off the car again after connecting and ensure the back of the car rises upwards and they stay connected. I definitely did this today... ...is there a better way to test the hitch?

The latch was still in the closed position after it had come off (so the problem seems to be how tight the "clamp" under the ball is rather than the latch lifting).

I'll be giving it a good clean/inspect/test next time I am down at the yard to see if I can see any obvious issues. It may get replaced anyway as I've now lost confidence in it.

Quote:
Rainwater wouldn't have been a factor-a good bump would have done it if the rainwater could do it.
Ah I know it wasn't the cause, meerly the straw which broke the camel's back (or tipped the balance in this case!). But it was laziness that I didn't drain it and 50-100 kg of unsecured load sloshing about probably isn't good for the trailer handling anyway!
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 July 2011, 16:40   #4
Member
 
Bigmuz7's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Glasgow
Boat name: stramash
Make: Tornado
Length: 5m +
Engine: Etec 90
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 5,068
Hmm .. you're not the sort to leave a major part like that undone Polwart, although we all make mistakes for sure.

I have wondered about how much wear on a ball is allowable though. We hire out trailers a fair amount, and I had one issue where a taxi driver ran into the back of one of my customers with one of our fairly new plant trailers on when it was empty .. as they have a flat arse, the impact was good, and the tow vehicle got its tow bar/frame bent, and the hitch became disconnected, so.. the question was how worn was his ball ? .. I binned the hitch head in question after the event and inspected all other parts ofcourse but was unable to get a working theory on why the hitch seperated,.. other than the fact that it over articulated ?

Needless to say the said customer was suddenly swarmed with 'witnesses' from other taxis supporting the offender, even though the victim was stattic at a junction

Id sort the bumper and be glad your safety gear worked .. end of
__________________
Bigmuz7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 July 2011, 17:26   #5
Member
 
Country: Other
Town: Stanley, Falkland Is
Boat name: Seawolf
Make: Osprey Vipermax 5.8
Length: 5m +
Engine: Etec 150
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 3,688
I suppose the law has something to say about it over there, but I can probably ignore it here ... I have always wondered whether it is better to have a trailer with breakaway brakes, or one with a whopping great chain as a backup.

Obviously an unbraked trailer has to have a chain, but I've been giving serious thought as to what to do with the trailer I have, as I'd rather have to buy a new back window for the 110 than fish the boat out of a ditch. If mine jumped off the hitch, the breakaway cable would apply the trailer brakes but what are the chances of it stopping in a straight line behind the vehicle - especially a boat trailer where the brakes have been in salt water. Probably not a lot - has anybody had it happen?
__________________
A Boat is a hole in the water, surrounded by fibreglass, into which you throw money...

Sent from my Computer, using a keyboard and mouse
BogMonster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 July 2011, 17:33   #6
RIBnet admin team
 
willk's Avatar
 
Country: Ireland
Make: Redbay Boats
Length: 9m +
Engine: 370hp
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 12,926
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by BogMonster View Post
Sent from my Computer, using a keyboard and mouse
Good man!
__________________
willk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 July 2011, 18:15   #7
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigmuz7 View Post
Hmm .. you're not the sort to leave a major part like that undone Polwart, although we all make mistakes for sure.
Oh I most certainly could make a really stupid mistake like not hitching it up correctly... ...but on this occasional I know I checked it (although obviously not well enough!) as the kids asked what I was doing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BogMonster View Post
I suppose the law has something to say about it over there, but I can probably ignore it here ... I have always wondered whether it is better to have a trailer with breakaway brakes, or one with a whopping great chain as a backup.
Indeed - this is a total weight of less than 500kg so unbraked and with 2 big (3/8"? diam) chains. My car weighs something like 1500 kg (IIRC) so the ratio of the weights is probably similar to your LR and boat? Stopping it at serious speed would be very "interesting". Although again that may be less of a concern for you than the average UK boater.
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 July 2011, 18:22   #8
DM
RIBnet supporter
 
Country: UK - England
Boat name: Little Wing
Make: Searider 5.4
Length: 5m +
Engine: Tohatsu 90
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart View Post
I'm not certain what caused the issue and will need to do some more investigating.
Simple. Hook the boat up to your jalopy, put a jack under the drawbar and crank it up. If the hitch flies off, somethings shagged. If the back of the jalopy rises and holds the hitch tight, consider yerself a nobend.
DM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 July 2011, 18:42   #9
RIBnet admin team
 
Nos4r2's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: The wilds of Wiltshire
Boat name: WhiteNoise/Dominator
Make: Ballistic 7.8/SR5.4
Length: 7m +
Engine: Opti 225/Yam 85
MMSI: 235090687/235055163
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 12,645
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart View Post
Indeed - that is why I posted - I thought I was pretty thorough at checking the connection was good. I always try to lift the trailer off the car again after connecting and ensure the back of the car rises upwards and they stay connected. I definitely did this today... ...is there a better way to test the hitch?
I wind up the jockey wheel so the hitch locks on, then give it a few winds to lift the back of the car very slightly above the normal unloaded driving position. With a light trailer your jockey wheel might not allow this though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart View Post
The latch was still in the closed position after it had come off (so the problem seems to be how tight the "clamp" under the ball is rather than the latch lifting).

I'll be giving it a good clean/inspect/test next time I am down at the yard to see if I can see any obvious issues. It may get replaced anyway as I've now lost confidence in it.

Ah I know it wasn't the cause, meerly the straw which broke the camel's back (or tipped the balance in this case!). But it was laziness that I didn't drain it and 50-100 kg of unsecured load sloshing about probably isn't good for the trailer handling anyway!
Pressed steel hitch? I wonder if it was excessive flex in the hitch or hitch mechanism itself.

I hate them-when I had one on the SR4's trailer I used to put a cheap long hasped padlock (or when that refused to work, as cheap padlocks do, a pin) through the slot in the hitch mechanism to stop any possibility of the mechanism flexing and allowing the latch to move backwards far enough to undo.

You might find in testing you'll have to duplicate the effects of the water sloshing-but I'd just change the hitch anyway. It's failed once so it'll do it again.
__________________
Need spares,consoles,consumables,hire,training or even a new boat?

Please click HERE and HERE and support our Trade Members.

Join up as a Trade member or Supporter HERE
Nos4r2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 July 2011, 19:13   #10
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by DM View Post
Simple. Hook the boat up to your jalopy, put a jack under the drawbar and crank it up. If the hitch flies off, somethings shagged. If the back of the jalopy rises and holds the hitch tight, consider yerself a nobend.
Are these mutually exclusive... because I already know I'm a nobend which will save getting the jack out the cupboard.

Test method noted for trip to boatyard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nos4r2 View Post
I wind up the jockey wheel so the hitch locks on, then give it a few winds to lift the back of the car very slightly above the normal unloaded driving position. With a light trailer your jockey wheel might not allow this though.
it used to but its seized so its "jack" function no longer works - its on the to do list.
Quote:
Pressed steel hitch?....

...I hate them-when I had one on the SR4's trailer I used to put a cheap long hasped padlock (or when that refused to work, as cheap padlocks do, a pin) through the slot in the hitch mechanism to stop any possibility of the mechanism flexing and allowing the latch to move backwards far enough to undo.
It is indeed a pressed steel thing - normally I have a padlock on there as a token gesture at security for motorway services etc but I didn't bother as I was only taking it back from the house to the boatyard (3 miles). Although of course that is clutching at straws!
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 16:16.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.