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Old 13 February 2011, 17:29   #1
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Rolling weight-increase on a gradient?

Hi guys .. Maths was never my forte.. But does anyone know if there's a formula to figure how much weight increases as you increase the gradient you're pulling it? In practical terms.. If you can pull 1000kg on flat level surface.. What will this 1000 weigh if you increase the gradient up to 20 or 30% let's say?!
Cheers..
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Old 13 February 2011, 18:45   #2
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In theory you can! http://doernenburg.alien.de/arch/bau/bau_02_e.php
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Old 14 February 2011, 07:01   #3
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I think I'm more confused now than earlier! ...
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Old 14 February 2011, 09:55   #4
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1000 kg is always going to weigh 1000kg.

As for what I think your question is...

When pulling 1000kg, you are really pulling very little weight (force for the purist) (you could push it by hand). If you were to tow up a vertical slope you'd be pulling 1000kg.

Calculating an approximate "pulling" component of 1000kg on a given angle would be what that "SIN" button on your calculator does.

ex.

20 degree slope (SIN 20) .34 x 1000 = 340 kg plus normal rolling resistance

Want to see how wimpy your car really is? Watch this....

Or perhaps how strong duct tape is!



The tow rating on a vehicle takes all of this into consideration, with a rope over a cliff holding 1000kg your car could not actually "tow/pull 1000kg"... It can however pull something that weighs 1000kg on roads of reasonable grade.
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Old 14 February 2011, 10:56   #5
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Just get one of these...

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Old 14 February 2011, 16:51   #6
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Holy crap.. Good ad for the 4x4 .. And for the winch!! The whole reason I ask this is getting back to saving the clutch.. Towing a ton on the level is all good, it's just from a standing start on a slipway it puts a lot of stress on the clutch.. With the turbo diesel too you have to rev it to get the turbo on.. So in turn you have to slip the clutch a little.. Vicious circle I guess!!
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Old 15 March 2011, 01:04   #7
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Im facing a very similar problem, I have a boat that ways nearly 3 ton i think, a trailer that will way about 1 ton when its made and a hill you cant walk up without having a break, (well nearly) I bought a tractor for pulling the boat, i have no concerns for going up the hill or starting off as i can go into 1st low but going down the hill i dont know if its going to run off, yes i can use my brakes but not for to long as i will get brake fade, so the first time i try it im going to have another tractor behind me with a strap ready for holding me back,
Maybe some people will think this is not nessesary but for the first time thats what im trying.
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Old 15 March 2011, 05:35   #8
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It's all going to be about traction/grip, isn't it? Hopefully there's no loose material on the tarmac... With that kind of weight, it might be possible for the load to simply push the tractor downhill, potentially with the brakes locked
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Old 15 March 2011, 05:56   #9
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Is it a 'proper' tractor or a little Iseki type thing?
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Old 15 March 2011, 08:14   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Screaming04 View Post
The tow rating on a vehicle takes all of this into consideration, with a rope over a cliff holding 1000kg your car could not actually "tow/pull 1000kg"... It can however pull something that weighs 1000kg on roads of reasonable grade.
Almost.

It's basically a defined version of a standing start under max load on a steep bit at the top of the Grossglokner pass where the air is about as thin as it's going to get in a car.

It also takes into account your car's ability to stop said mass.
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