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Old 25 August 2015, 14:41   #1
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repairing the front wheel to crank up and down

The crank that raises and lowers the front wheel of my EZ loader trailer got stuck, wouldn't turn and, stupidly, I forced it. Immediately something inside the cylinder disengaged from the crank. Now it turns but isn't connected to the wheel mechanism. Is this something an amateur can fix, or do i need special tools and parts? If so, can someone explain it to me in plain language, or even better, point to a Youtube that will show me how to do it. Thanks in advance.
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Old 25 August 2015, 15:04   #2
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Are you talking about a jockey wheel? Something like this:
Trailer Caravan Jockey Wheel & Clamp 34mm LMX353 | eBay


If so I'm not sure once you get it open you'll find much user serviceable inside. I suspect its probably full of rusted failed crud. For the cost of a replacement (16.50 GBP, cheaper if you have a functioning clamp) its hard to imagine being able to get the replacement inside parts for your specific model cheaper.
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Old 25 August 2015, 15:12   #3
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I have an easyloader trailer. When the jockey wheel winding mech failed I simply replaced it - I'd consider it a consumable part, you can prolong life with grease and regular movement but once the rust gets to the point of something breaking even if it could be fixed it will only be a short time till it seizes again.
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Old 25 August 2015, 15:51   #4
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Thanks for the info. I'll have to look more closely, but i think it has a functional clamp. I'll check out the local price for a new one.
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Old 25 August 2015, 16:04   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beluga11 View Post
Thanks for the info. I'll have to look more closely, but i think it has a functional clamp. I'll check out the local price for a new one.
Assuming still the same design the ezloader one was a bit different to the one ShinyShoe posted - it has pivot on the shaft so it rotates and lies along the chassis in transit. Not sure if they are common in the USA but not on this side of the pond.
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Old 26 August 2015, 01:19   #6
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They're very common here.

Problem with jacks is that nobody makes one that lasts worth a damn. I've had good luck with the latest one I've bought: a Fulton F2. Unfortunately, I can't really give you a lifespan, as I've scaled back boating for the last couple of years. But, from what I understand, it's rebuildable, which the others aren't.

Prior to the F2, I usually ended up replacing every couple of years. Ditto with the winch (though a strap replacement may extend life if the rest isn't rusted out.)

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Old 26 August 2015, 02:51   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poly View Post
Assuming still the same design the ezloader one was a bit different to the one ShinyShoe posted - it has pivot on the shaft so it rotates and lies along the chassis in transit. Not sure if they are common in the USA but not on this side of the pond.
You can buy a swivel mounting bracket in the UK. Not expensive. There seems a certain irony that they are more common in the US. In my experience of US roads they are perfectly smooth. In the UK they are prefectly rough. I've always asumed the swive was to reduce underhangs for bumpy surfaces!
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Old 27 August 2015, 12:58   #8
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You can buy a swivel mounting bracket in the UK. Not expensive. There seems a certain irony that they are more common in the US. In my experience of US roads they are perfectly smooth. In the UK they are prefectly rough. I've always asumed the swive was to reduce underhangs for bumpy surfaces!
You obviously have not trailered a boat in California. Our highways are anything but smooth. I suspect that we may have more mountainous roads than you, as well (though that's just a guess.)

The OP was (and probably still is) in Washington state, USA. He should be able to get a swivel jack pretty easily.

Back to the OP's question: depending on the make and model of the jack, it *may* be repairable, but I find they're a real PITA. Gears at the top are pinned to the respective shafts; the threaded rod is usually fitted in the bearing block and the tube is crimped to hold it all in place (this was on a few Fulton unit's I've had.) Though the parts are (or at least may be) zinc plated, they don't last long in a marine environment. Threaded rod and a lot of the internals are mild steel and are prone to locking up from corrosion. You'll save yourself a lot of swearing by simply replacing it.

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Old 27 August 2015, 13:35   #9
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thanks for info, jyasaki. I guess i need to find the brand and model of the broken one, then simply replace it.

Roads? what roads. we drive on game trails in the Pacific NW. lol
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Old 28 August 2015, 11:11   #10
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thanks for info, jyasaki. I guess i need to find the brand and model of the broken one, then simply replace it.
Not really. Just need to get a replacement that lifts and lowers within the correct range (which you can estimate.) They're all pretty similar for the most part.


Quote:
Roads? what roads. we drive on game trails in the Pacific NW. lol
Yeah, well you guys are a bunch of savages. :-) With really nice scenery.


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