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Old 13 July 2008, 12:12   #1
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Removing outer bearing shell

Hi,

Just replaced both sets of bearing on trailer on each side but had to get a local workshop to remove the outer bearing shell! Inner one was easy with a punch as there was a nice lip on it to hammer the shell out however the way the hub is made, looking down the centre of the hub from inside to out, the inner bearing shell is flush with the hub! (M&E Axle - bearing kit is peak 200 /203 so not sure if it's a peak drum).

The workshop manged to break 3 tools in the process but they wouldn't tell me how they got the shells out :-)

So - anyone had a similar experience and how did you get the shells out!

Happy I replaced both sides - Trailer only serviced 6 months ago and I think I've only launched / recovered 5 times (shockingly poor use of the boat) and inner bearings were basically trashed. I think because it lives in a yard, despite topping up the bearing savers, grease simply doesn't get to inner bearing as it's not being towed!

Thanks
Al
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Old 13 July 2008, 22:55   #2
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http://www.planetnautique.com/index....rticle&sid=134

But it sounds like he had it easier than you did, since he had some exposed race to pound out.

jky
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Old 14 July 2008, 06:14   #3
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Originally Posted by al40 View Post
Hi,

Just replaced both sets of bearing on trailer on each side but had to get a local workshop to remove the outer bearing shell! Inner one was easy with a punch as there was a nice lip on it to hammer the shell out however the way the hub is made, looking down the centre of the hub from inside to out, the inner bearing shell is flush with the hub! (M&E Axle - bearing kit is peak 200 /203 so not sure if it's a peak drum).

The workshop manged to break 3 tools in the process but they wouldn't tell me how they got the shells out :-)

So - anyone had a similar experience and how did you get the shells out!

Happy I replaced both sides - Trailer only serviced 6 months ago and I think I've only launched / recovered 5 times (shockingly poor use of the boat) and inner bearings were basically trashed. I think because it lives in a yard, despite topping up the bearing savers, grease simply doesn't get to inner bearing as it's not being towed!

Thanks
Al
Al,

I've not changed the bearings, same age as your originals, that slip lets you launch without the bearings being submerged,if you launched it yourself there would'nt be an issue..even more so in your case as the drum never get a bit of heat in them.

He a lovely bloke but very busy,Friday night and Monday morn,it's arses and alligators at that slip, trailers can be fully submerged for some time,and with yours never getting a chance to dry out.......
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Old 14 July 2008, 15:55   #4
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Al,

I've not changed the bearings, same age as your originals, that slip lets you launch without the bearings being submerged,if you launched it yourself there would'nt be an issue..even more so in your case as the drum never get a bit of heat in them.

He a lovely bloke but very busy,Friday night and Monday morn,it's arses and alligators at that slip, trailers can be fully submerged for some time,and with yours never getting a chance to dry out.......
Indeed - I think there is a lot to be said for towing the trailer after it's been recovered and getting some heat in there to dry things out. I've actually been recovering it myself most times and towing it round the yard to dry the brakes off (which really seems to have helped as brakes are in good condition).
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Old 14 July 2008, 15:57   #5
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http://www.planetnautique.com/index....rticle&sid=134

But it sounds like he had it easier than you did, since he had some exposed race to pound out.

jky
Yip - if there was a lip I could have got a screwdriver onto it - could just about catch it but not sufficiently to get any real force on it. Would be interested to see how the "pro's" do it. Stupidly I forgot to take any photo's of the whole process, probably something to do with being covered in grease
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Old 14 July 2008, 16:11   #6
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So - anyone had a similar experience and how did you get the shells out!

Al
hi Al, do you mean the bit that's stuck in the drum?

if so a simple way to get it out is using a mig welder to put a run of weld around the inside of it, get it nice and hot and when it cools it just falls out, never had to do it on a boat trailer but it works well on bigger stuff (cars/tractors)

jim
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Old 14 July 2008, 16:30   #7
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hi Al, do you mean the bit that's stuck in the drum?

if so a simple way to get it out is using a mig welder to put a run of weld around the inside of it, get it nice and hot and when it cools it just falls out, never had to do it on a boat trailer but it works well on bigger stuff (cars/tractors)

jim
Hi Jim,

Yes exactly the bit that's hammered into the drum.

I've certainly seen a guy working on a tractor cylinder that did just that! Now if only I had a MIG kit :-)
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Old 15 July 2008, 11:51   #8
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Maybe some spray freeze on the race itself? (You can use a can of computer duster as well: just turn the can upside-down.) Or heat the drum and then hit the race with freeze.

jky
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Old 15 July 2008, 15:49   #9
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Maybe some spray freeze on the race itself? (You can use a can of computer duster as well: just turn the can upside-down.) Or heat the drum and then hit the race with freeze.

jky
That sounds like a good suggestion - get the drum nice and hot and locally freeze the shell....

Daft thing is I have a can of said freezer spray in my desk, didn't even think about it
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Old 15 July 2008, 21:00   #10
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If I remember right, that's how starter ring gears are put on flywheels: Cool the flywheel, heat the ring, place it on (or beat it on is probably more accurate), and let everything normalize.

Should be the same, except the ring you want is on the inside.

Luck;

jky
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