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Old 15 June 2018, 14:54   #1
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Grease or not

On your boat trailer what grease do you put on the wheel studs or bolts, marine grease, copper grease or something else?
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Old 15 June 2018, 15:20   #2
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Donít put anything on wheel studs !
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Old 15 June 2018, 16:16   #3
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I put a very light smear of copperslip on the studs. General wisdom is not to grease wheel studs, but generally wheel studs don't get repeatedly dunked in seawater.
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Old 15 June 2018, 16:36   #4
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from a tire fitters website

There is a great deal of argument is whether to lubricate lug threads. Some swear by the use of some form of anti-seize on the threads, whether lithium grease, WD-40, motor oil or Teflon spray. The idea is to prevent rust and make it easier when it comes time to remove the lugs. Others recoil in horror, saying that lubing the threads will iresult in overtorqued nuts, or that the lubrication will cause the nuts to work themselves loose.

Manufacturers, engineers and other industry experts seem to unanimously oppose using lubrication. On the other hand, some customers, DIYers and self-appointed Internet forum experts claim to have used thread lube since the very dawn of time with nary a problem.

My own opinion is more nuanced. I disapprove of lubricating threads in general, unless they are badly rusted. Most lug bolts and lug studs are coated with a substance intended to prevent rust, but certain makes and models seem to be much more vulnerable to rust than others (Iím looking at you, Volvo).

In that case I can see applying a small amount of lubricant to prevent further corrosion, but only after carefully cleaning the rust off the threads with a wire brush. In most cases, however, I would simply ensure that the threads are clean and not bother with lubrication.

If you do apply lubricant, make sure to do so carefully and only to the threads. Never allow any lubricant on the mating surfaces of the nut or the lughole of the wheel.

Much of the ďstickinessĒ brought about by proper torque comes not from the threads but from the contact between mating surfaces. Even a thin film of oil between those surfaces can create a hydraulic barrier, preventing proper torque from being applied. This can also make it easier for the nut to work itself loose.

Either way, itís always best to get that customer to return in two weeks to check the lug nuts for tightness if any lubricants are used.
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Old 15 June 2018, 16:39   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimRib View Post
Donít put anything on wheel studs !
Really?

Ive always put never seez on threads, not on the wheel/stud mating surface though.
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Old 15 June 2018, 16:49   #6
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I can’t remember the last time I torqued any wheel nuts
Just swing on a bar till it’s FT
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Old 15 June 2018, 16:51   #7
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I just use the windy gun
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Old 15 June 2018, 17:07   #8
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Silicon grease lightly or PTFE spray check regular never had a problem or getting them off . I was told in Inverness even with dry nuts a wheel should be re-tightened after 200 hundred miles if it's been off OMO
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Old 15 June 2018, 17:14   #9
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copaslip for wheel nuts and bolts especially if its getting dipped in the sea anything is better than nothing I generally don't look at stuff until it falls to bits and ive never had any issues getting stuff apart
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Old 16 June 2018, 02:53   #10
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I've been using a slight smear of marine grease on my trailer wheel bolts and have done for years. Do the same on cars. Get yourself an extendable wheel ratchet (I carry one in all my cars) as the standard wheel brace is next to useless.

Remember a Volkswagen Polo my wife had years ago that the wheel lugs were absolutely seized. I applied pressure using a ratchet and extension bar and a little puff of rust and unmistakable crack and wheel bolt sheared. Lucking I managed to remove the remaining threaded stud as you can't drill hardened steel on the drive!

Good practice to check torque periodically.
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