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Old 29 April 2013, 16:57   #1
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Engine position for towing

There are many opinions about tilted, blocked, down as far as possible.
I'm of the opinion that for towing the engine should be tilted, turned and supported. That way it is bearing down on the transom and mounts whilst bouncing around on the trailer. With it in its down position whilst towing the outboard pulls on the transom with every bump on the road, also the prop is very close to the road.
The manufacturers design the tilt mech for transport no?
I agree that rams and/or supports may need help in the form of blocks, but this is the way to trailer them surely.
The reason for this question is that I have had a few steadfast comments about trailering with the engines in the down position. I reckon you should tow with the engines tilted and supported.
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Old 29 April 2013, 17:06   #2
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I tow mine with engine tilted, turned to one side, and supported by a block of wood ( so power ram is not taking the weight,) , that way lower leg is well clear of the road, although my transon is right above the rear roller on trailer, not had any problems.
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Old 29 April 2013, 17:10   #3
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Less stress on transom with the motor in down position. (force straight down). But skeg is too close to the ground..... Hence the use of support bar to reduce transom twist force. In my mind the transom is designed to take this twisting load anyway, as the engine under power is also making this force. A strong rib should be fine.. If it breaks whilst being towed, is it fit for a rough sea?

Is the support block/ bar to stop the ram creeping down also?
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Old 29 April 2013, 17:13   #4
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With an engine trimmed out bouncing about on the waves there will be far more stress on the rams and transom, that said, I use a price of 4x2 to support it when on the trailer.
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Old 29 April 2013, 17:14   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simsy View Post
Less stress on transom with the motor in down position. (force straight down). But skeg is too close to the ground..... Hence the use of support bar to reduce transom twist force. In my mind the transom is designed to take this twisting load anyway, as the engine under power is also making this force. A strong rib should be fine.. If it breaks whilst being towed, is it fit for a rough sea?

Is the support to stop he ram creeping down?
If the motor is down it is behind the transom and pivoting over the mounts, don't forget that when the prop is pushing the boat it is actually pushing up and forwards.
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Old 29 April 2013, 17:15   #6
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lots about this here
Outboard up or down
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Old 29 April 2013, 17:17   #7
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lots about this here
Outboard up or down
Totally correct, there's lots there, what's the view? Well I think I know the correct answer, just need a convincing argument that convinces me that it's worth considering engine down. Which I won't anyway.
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Old 30 April 2013, 00:02   #8
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There are numerous hypotheses that get discussed and different folks have different views. Nowt wrong with that.

Never spent enough time considering every pro and con angle so have just gone with the Ribcraft/Suzuki advice we were given at handover: engine up, no chock, any steering angle, enjoy

Can't say as I've ever heard that any particular configuration caused anybody a problem.
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Old 01 May 2013, 12:39   #9
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There are numerous hypotheses that get discussed and different folks have different views. Nowt wrong with that.

Never spent enough time considering every pro and con angle so have just gone with the Ribcraft/Suzuki advice we were given at handover: engine up, no chock, any steering angle, enjoy

Can't say as I've ever heard that any particular configuration caused anybody a problem.
I agree with Leapy - had same advice from RC at handover - Engine fully up, no chock, crack on.
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Old 02 May 2013, 09:54   #10
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My engine will drift slowly down over time so could potentially drop low enough to hit the ground. It does however have a "flip over" transport brace which it lowers onto giving it a firm transport position. In my opinion, raising it puts the weight directly over the transom, rather than behind it, however I dont think the forces during trailing are going to be significant compated to forces exerted on the water.

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