Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 19 November 2011, 20:20   #11
Member
 
hadd's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Manchester
Boat name: "mr Jingles"
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: 130 Etec
MMSI: 235074968
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,388
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by Erin View Post
I think you're meant to tighten the nut on the back plate until the shoes just start to bind and then back it off a bit. The nut pulls a wedge between the ends of the shoes and opens them out to operate them, a bit like the brake cable does. As Trailer Guy says, if you take up the slack using the brake cable instead then it affects the anti-reverse operation on that type of shoe.
I will try that & see what happen,s
__________________

__________________
hadd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 November 2011, 04:58   #12
Member
 
Trailer Guy's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Hampshire
Boat name: Altea 2
Make: Narwhal
Length: 5m +
Engine: 90 Mariner
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 855
Spot on Erin. If you've got Knott brakes (likely) then there'll be an adjuster nut on the back / inside face of your backplate, probably near the top.

You'll need a 17mm spanner (ratchet one's useful, if you have one of those) or a 3/8" ratchet and 17mm socket.

With the handbrake off, coupling head pulled out to full extension (forwards), wheels up off the deck, and your cable adjustment corrected as previously discussed, do the adjuster up (i.e. clockwise) until you can't turn the wheel anymore.

Only turn the wheel in a forward rotation! (if you start adjusting and turn it backwards you'll engage the auto-reverse function).

Then slacken off the adjuster nut by two full turns (i.e. 2 x 360 degree anti-clockwise revolutions).

This should be about right. Obviously, there's variables - amount of meat left on the shoes, surface pitting on the drums etc etc, but that should see you ok.

Happy fiddling

PS. C-NUMB - you've got Alko brakes, so you have a star wheel adjuster. Do the same as above, except you should find a green blanking plug on your backplate (which may have fallen off over time!). In fact, you should see two - one is near the outer edge, this is to check how much pad is left on your shoes and one slightly further in towards the centre, this is the adjuster one - which is the one we're interested in. If the green plug's still there then pop it off to reveal the adjusting hole.

Use a small, flat bladed screwdriver and adjust the star wheel in the direction of the arrow and letter 'C' stamped next to the hole, until you can't move the wheel in a forward direction (same as above - don't turn it backwards!), then adjust the star wheel so it releases the wheel and it can turn freely. Hopefully that should be yours sorted too.
__________________

Trailer Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 November 2011, 16:01   #13
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Gloucestershire
Boat name: Osprey
Make: Osprey Vipermax
Length: 5m +
Engine: E-tec 300 G2
MMSI: TBC
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,013
Having just done a load of Alko Drums I can offer one piece of advice that an Alko engineer gave me a while back.

At the ends of the cables that go into the bracket on teh axle put some small zip ties around the cable just where it comes out of the rubber gland.

After you have set all the adjusters on the drums as described above then put on the handbrake and check the zip ties in relation to the rubber glands to see how far the cables have come out of the glands. Ideally you want them all the same and coming out about 8-10mm. If any are coming out to far then go back that drum and open up the shoes a bit more with the adjuster or close them up if the cable is moving less than 8mm.

Once you have done this take the trailer for a spin then come back and recheck / adjust. Having done this on all my previous trailers and the current one I have always ended up with perfectly balanced brakes...

I now leave yellow zip ties on the cables all the time so that I can occasionally and easily check to see how much wear on the shoes.

My one piece of advise on trailer brakes is strip, re-grease and rebuild every 6 months. Leave it a year and you will be breaking out the heavy artillery !
__________________
---------------------------------------------------
Chris Stevens

Born fiddler
Chris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 November 2011, 03:27   #14
RIBnet supporter
 
Pikey Dave's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: South Yorks
Boat name: Black Pig
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: DF140a
MMSI: 235111389
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 7,582
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris View Post
Having just done a load of Alko Drums I can offer one piece of advice that an Alko engineer gave me a while back.

At the ends of the cables that go into the bracket on teh axle put some small zip ties around the cable just where it comes out of the rubber gland.

After you have set all the adjusters on the drums as described above then put on the handbrake and check the zip ties in relation to the rubber glands to see how far the cables have come out of the glands. Ideally you want them all the same and coming out about 8-10mm. If any are coming out to far then go back that drum and open up the shoes a bit more with the adjuster or close them up if the cable is moving less than 8mm.

Once you have done this take the trailer for a spin then come back and recheck / adjust. Having done this on all my previous trailers and the current one I have always ended up with perfectly balanced brakes...

I now leave yellow zip ties on the cables all the time so that I can occasionally and easily check to see how much wear on the shoes.
Good tip Chris
__________________
Rule#2: Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level & then beat you with experience.
Rule#3: Tha' can't educate pork.
Rule#4: See rule#5
Pikey Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 November 2011, 05:41   #15
Member
 
hadd's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Manchester
Boat name: "mr Jingles"
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: 130 Etec
MMSI: 235074968
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,388
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris
Having just done a load of Alko Drums I can offer one piece of advice that an Alko engineer gave me a while back.

At the ends of the cables that go into the bracket on teh axle put some small zip ties around the cable just where it comes out of the rubber gland.

After you have set all the adjusters on the drums as described above then put on the handbrake and check the zip ties in relation to the rubber glands to see how far the cables have come out of the glands. Ideally you want them all the same and coming out about 8-10mm. If any are coming out to far then go back that drum and open up the shoes a bit more with the adjuster or close them up if the cable is moving less than 8mm.

Once you have done this take the trailer for a spin then come back and recheck / adjust. Having done this on all my previous trailers and the current one I have always ended up with perfectly balanced brakes...

I now leave yellow zip ties on the cables all the time so that I can occasionally and easily check to see how much wear on the shoes.

My one piece of advise on trailer brakes is strip, re-grease and rebuild every 6 months. Leave it a year and you will be breaking out the heavy artillery !
Nice one Chris , I will give it a go at the weekend & let you know how I get on
__________________
Member of S.A.B.S NW Division
All good thing's come to those who wait!!.
hadd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30 November 2011, 12:03   #16
Member
 
hadd's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Manchester
Boat name: "mr Jingles"
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: 130 Etec
MMSI: 235074968
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,388
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris View Post
Having just done a load of Alko Drums I can offer one piece of advice that an Alko engineer gave me a while back.

At the ends of the cables that go into the bracket on teh axle put some small zip ties around the cable just where it comes out of the rubber gland.

After you have set all the adjusters on the drums as described above then put on the handbrake and check the zip ties in relation to the rubber glands to see how far the cables have come out of the glands. Ideally you want them all the same and coming out about 8-10mm. If any are coming out to far then go back that drum and open up the shoes a bit more with the adjuster or close them up if the cable is moving less than 8mm.

Once you have done this take the trailer for a spin then come back and recheck / adjust. Having done this on all my previous trailers and the current one I have always ended up with perfectly balanced brakes...

I now leave yellow zip ties on the cables all the time so that I can occasionally and easily check to see how much wear on the shoes.

My one piece of advise on trailer brakes is strip, re-grease and rebuild every 6 months. Leave it a year and you will be breaking out the heavy artillery !
Just managed to get my brakes sorted on the trailer today, i've done everything you said chris & now they are working fine thanks for the tip mate,cheers Andy.
__________________

__________________
hadd is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 00:53.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.