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Old 11 June 2019, 15:06   #1
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Additional Axle on Trailer for 6.50m Rib

I have a 6.5m RIB and an Indespension Trailer (V793) 1500-2000kg. Braked with a single axle.

I want to put an additional axle on it for peace of mind and make it a double axle trailer.

Can anyone talk me through this process or has anyone done it.
Price?
Does the new axle need to be braked?
Put it in-front or behind the existing axle?
Need to move the existing axle?

Thanks

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Old 11 June 2019, 15:33   #2
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Donít forget the weight of the additional axle will reduce the load capacity of the trailer. If you are close to the max weight now, adding an axle could take you over.
You will probably have to move the existing axle to balance up the outfit.
Doesnít matter whether you put it in front or behind.
Needs to be braked, you might have to modify the hitch and/or brake rod/equaliser to accommodate the extra brakes.
A full axle will be around the £500 mark, or they were the last time I looked.
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Old 11 June 2019, 17:41   #3
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My thoughts are ,that axle on the trailer is a big heavy 1800kg beast with expensive wheels and tyres ,you may be better to put that axle on ebay ,and buy a couple of ally ,peak or similar axles which will go about £300 each ,those indespension axles are silly money ,and besides your only really looking for 2x1000kg or 2x1300kg max ,should put you well in limit ,as pd says you will need additional brake rods etc but axels should come with brake cables ,need to check your hitch rating ,you,ll do well to get change from 1K i reckon ,but worth doing !
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Old 11 June 2019, 18:18   #4
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Thanks both.
Boat 750kg plus 120kg of engine plus say 150kg of kit and aux and 100kg of fuel so topping out at 1100kg to 1200kg. Should leave plenty of capacity if the trailer weight is increased a bit.

Will get a couple of quotes and see what happens.
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Old 12 June 2019, 04:11   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pikey Dave View Post
Donít forget the weight of the additional axle will reduce the load capacity of the trailer. If you are close to the max weight now, adding an axle could take you over.
You will probably have to move the existing axle to balance up the outfit.
Doesnít matter whether you put it in front or behind.
Needs to be braked, you might have to modify the hitch and/or brake rod/equaliser to accommodate the extra brakes.
A full axle will be around the £500 mark, or they were the last time I looked.
echo what dave says plus i think you would have to get it replated because you're changing the trailer spec, rules changed on making trailers as i believe looking at costs not far off a new trailer. not sure what piece of mind your after but you could upgrade to a waterproof bearing axle and run flat tyers
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Old 12 June 2019, 06:58   #6
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I've done this a couple of times...single to twin axle and twin to triple.
Locating the axles is pretty straight forward. The middle of the gap between the two wheels has to go where wheels are just now.

However the regs were a lot more ambiguous in the past and when I did it the reason was to upgrade the carrying capacity of the trailers (a fair bit of additional metal work as well).
I would doubt if there is any cost effective way you can do this that wouldn't put you on the wrong side of the law unless the trailer is very old, pre early 90s. and I'd question the benefit. If one wheel bearing fails you're on the hard shoulder whether it's a two or a four wheel trailer and you've doubled the likely hood of having a failure by having twice as many bearings. I'd just spend the money on meticulous maintenance of what you've got.
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Old 12 June 2019, 07:52   #7
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bit of info as i read has to be passed by VOSA


http://www.armitagetrailers.com/trailerlaw.htm
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Old 12 June 2019, 09:56   #8
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Personally I'd say your better off with your single axle for the reasons already stated and the easier maneuverability when unhitched
If you do decide to switch the axle for a tenner you can replate to current spec & or date the trailer pre new regulations regarding type approval/ inspection
https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F163084276625
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Old 12 June 2019, 16:11   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Overboard View Post
I have a 6.5m RIB and an Indespension Trailer (V793) 1500-2000kg. Braked with a single axle.

I want to put an additional axle on it for peace of mind and make it a double axle trailer.

Can anyone talk me through this process or has anyone done it.
Price?
Does the new axle need to be braked?
Put it in-front or behind the existing axle?
Need to move the existing axle?

Thanks

Attachment 129716

As its an approved trailer which was built after 1985, then fitting an additional axle is a 'significant design change' and the trailer will require an IVA by the DVSA ........
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Old 13 June 2019, 10:27   #10
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Sod this idea then!
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