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Old 14 December 2008, 13:08   #31
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Discovery break the tow truck!!!

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Old 14 December 2008, 13:43   #32
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hee hee thanks for the link, very funny when the ford f250 bends in the middle I cant complain too much about landrovers they have done me well, even my newest one is geting on a bit now. it has its 49th birthday in jan 09 .(bits of it anyway)
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Old 15 December 2008, 17:07   #33
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Had my Audi remapped by MRC Tuning in Banbury. Very impressed. Not cheap at £500 but a genuine extra 50hp and 100Nm.

Engine checked for faults and boost leaks.
Base map put on the ECU and then car test driven with real time logging of airflow, rpm, air to fuel ratio and most importantly exhaust gas temperature.

Ignition timing and boost adjusted to give the best power without exceeding safe exhaust gas temperatures.

I would guess that a cheap e-bay "chip" for a turbo diesel would alter the signal to the wastegate actuator - this would make the engine give more boost than the ECU has requested. This will be OK up to a point but if the engine gets too much more boost than the ECU has requested it could surge or even go into limp mode. Or too much boost could give a too high exhaust gas temperature. Melted egt or lambda sensors or disintegrated turbo turbine.

Let us know how you get on if you get one.
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Old 15 December 2008, 18:07   #34
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...I would guess that a cheap e-bay "chip" for a turbo diesel would alter the signal to the wastegate actuator - this would make the engine give more boost than the ECU has requested. This will be OK up to a point but if the engine gets too much more boost than the ECU has requested it could surge or even go into limp mode. Or too much boost could give a too high exhaust gas temperature. Melted egt or lambda sensors or disintegrated turbo turbine.
I doubt it. More turbo boost would simply increase the amount of available air. To get more power, that air needs to be fueled.

In general, diesel engines are run lean. That is, there is plenty of air and a power gain can be realised by fueling some or all of the extra air. For little money on common rail diesel engines, it is possible to increase the amount of fuel delivered into the engine by increasing the fuel rail pressure. Only a singe resistor is required and a typical cost of this component is about 1p.

Knowing this, it is easy to understand why, on diesel vehicles which are running lean, (most of them), it is a waste of time using a free-flow air filter since the standard air filter is already flowing more air than the engine requires for its given power.
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Old 16 December 2008, 02:27   #35
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All I have had to do to it is change the propshaft UJs.

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I thought you had the whole thing rebuilt a few years ago? Don't I remember you sending it to someone who stripped it down to repair the chassis and bulkhead, then didn't have time to finish it.. or are the grey cells worse than normal this morning?
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Old 16 December 2008, 10:28   #36
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I thought you had the whole thing rebuilt a few years ago? Don't I remember you sending it to someone who stripped it down to repair the chassis and bulkhead, then didn't have time to finish it.. or are the grey cells worse than normal this morning?
No you are quite right. There was nothing worng with it really - just a bit of rust around the bulkhead vent. I aquired a new bulkhead and this tosser nagged me to do the work. He stripped the LR and never put it back together again.

It's still in bits so I am doing it myself. Turning it into a real beast with a full cage and a 300bhp engine. Putting in quaife diffs and air assisted suspension along with fdlle brakes etc.
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Old 16 December 2008, 12:57   #37
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I've had my 320d (E46) remapped by E-Maps

The guy that runs the company, Simon, was very helpful and knowledgable, he comes highly recommended on the BMW forums I use. Each remap is taylored to the individual engine. Had mine done about 6 months a go and noticed a significant increase in performance as well as a couple extra MPG due to the engine being more efficient.
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Old 16 December 2008, 15:32   #38
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Be careful running lots of boost, some places sell tuning boxes and you adjusts the wastegate yourself.
You can bend conrods by running too much boost.
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Old 16 December 2008, 17:07   #39
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I doubt it. More turbo boost would simply increase the amount of available air. To get more power, that air needs to be fueled.

In general, diesel engines are run lean. That is, there is plenty of air and a power gain can be realised by fueling some or all of the extra air. For little money on common rail diesel engines, it is possible to increase the amount of fuel delivered into the engine by increasing the fuel rail pressure. Only a singe resistor is required and a typical cost of this component is about 1p.

Knowing this, it is easy to understand why, on diesel vehicles which are running lean, (most of them), it is a waste of time using a free-flow air filter since the standard air filter is already flowing more air than the engine requires for its given power.
Ah, hadn't thought about the fuel pressure.

Extra air will be metered by the airflow meter and extra fuel provided by the ECU as required - up to a point where the ECU smells a rat.

I guess that a resistor piggy backed onto the airflow meter might also have the effect of increasing the fuel.

BTW - my car is petrol.
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Old 16 December 2008, 19:37   #40
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..BTW - my car is petrol.
Aha, well petrol is a different matter altogether because unless the fuel air ratio is within certain limits the mixture won't burn.

Diesel engines just draw in a maximum amount of air and fuel is delivered according to the power required, ie. throttle position, and it burns. It is though possible to force too much air into them by overzealous turbo charging so that after compression the cylinder pressures load the engine too much.

With regard to the addition of the resistor, this is only applicable to common rail diesel engines where the fuel rail pressure is sensed. The resistor modifies the signal from the sensor so that the ECU sees too low a fuel pressure and so the rail is pressurised above that which is normal for the engine. In the time the injectors are open, the higher fuel pressure will ensure an increased quantity of diesel is delivered into the cylinder. Since there is already ample air present, the extra fuel produces more power. It's very simple and it works well.

For those who may be interested, a resistor value of 200ohms will suit the 5 cylinder Mercedes 2.7 CRD engine used in the Merc ML series and the Jeep Grand Cherokee and, no doubt, others as well. A ¼watt resistor is fine. 200R may well suit other engines too but I've not been involved with any so can't say for sure.
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