Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 08 February 2007, 10:29   #1
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: London
Length: no boat
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 378
A 4x4 question (sorry). 4HLR vs 4LLR

A dumb 4x4 question and I really SHOULD know this.

With all this snow, seems opportune to ask.

Under what conditions should I be using 4HLR vs 4LLR or vice versa in my Shogun? I appreciate LLR is Low ratio (good for rock climbing). The manual is very unhelpful (describes LLR for "getting out of tight spots").

Deep sand?
Slippery slipways?
Snow?
Grass?
Deep mud?

Anyone recommend a low cost 4x4 training course?

Thanks

Rich
__________________

__________________
Rich L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 February 2007, 10:34   #2
Member
 
Country: Other
Town: Oakley
Boat name: Zerstörer
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki DF 140
MMSI: 235050131
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 3,931
Rich,

It all depends on the conditions in each of the circumstances you have stated.

Don't be afraid to use it and try it out for yourself. If you don't use these functions on 4 X 4s you eventually get problems with seals etc drying out.

I wouldn't have use Low Ratio today to get to work for instance but if I was crossing a muddy field then I would certainly consider it.

I wouldn't use it on a road or track with 1 inch of snow but certainly would if it was over 1 foot deep.

As regards a course here is somewhere to start looking.

http://www.landrover.org/Links.html

Regards Nick.
__________________

__________________
http://www.xfire.com/download/
Biggles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 February 2007, 10:36   #3
RIBnet supporter
 
bedajim's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Cambs/Northants
Length: no boat
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 2,499
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich L View Post
A dumb 4x4 question and I really SHOULD know this.

With all this snow, seems opportune to ask.

Under what conditions should I be using 4HLR vs 4LLR or vice versa in my Shogun? I appreciate LLR is Low ratio (good for rock climbing). The manual is very unhelpful (describes LLR for "getting out of tight spots").

Deep sand?
Slippery slipways?
Snow?
Grass?
Deep mud?

Anyone recommend a low cost 4x4 training course?

Thanks

Rich


2x4 - dry roads and normal driving

4x4 high - grass fields, snow, very very wet roads

4x4 low - sand, deeper snow, mud, fording water, boat/car recovery etc

You may also find that 4x4 switching is advised with the car stopped and it's best to be in the low range before you need it
__________________
bedajim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 February 2007, 14:00   #4
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: swansea
Boat name: Too Blue
Make: BLANK
Length: 8m +
Engine: Suzuki DT225
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 12,791
Do you get transmission windup on grippy surfaces with this setup then? Advantages of the LR are they are always in 4wd.
__________________
codprawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 February 2007, 14:46   #5
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Midlands
Make: Nautique
Length: 6m +
Engine: PCM 5.7l
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 1,082
Don't really see that as an advantage of the landrover.. Would much rather just be rwd on the roads all the time.

In my pickup today I only used 4wd on a handfull of roads which were completely covered in snow or up steep hills.
If you use 4wd on grippy surfaces when your tyres can't spin you get transmission windup which will do some damage over a period of time.

Low box, just for steep hills, wading, deep mud. Situations when you can't or don't want to drive at normal road speeds.
4wdHI, for snowy roads, slightly muddy fields, gravel tracks maybe. When you want to keep up a decent speed but aren't on a grippy surface.

Harry
__________________
simmons0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 February 2007, 15:16   #6
RIBnet supporter
 
bedajim's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Cambs/Northants
Length: no boat
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 2,499
Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
Do you get transmission windup on grippy surfaces with this setup then? Advantages of the LR are they are always in 4wd.

yes big time the truck jumps as the tyres let go
__________________
bedajim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 February 2007, 15:26   #7
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: swansea
Boat name: Too Blue
Make: BLANK
Length: 8m +
Engine: Suzuki DT225
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 12,791
Quote:
Originally Posted by simmons0 View Post
Don't really see that as an advantage of the landrover.. Would much rather just be rwd on the roads all the time.

In my pickup today I only used 4wd on a handfull of roads which were completely covered in snow or up steep hills.
If you use 4wd on grippy surfaces when your tyres can't spin you get transmission windup which will do some damage over a period of time.

Low box, just for steep hills, wading, deep mud. Situations when you can't or don't want to drive at normal road speeds.
4wdHI, for snowy roads, slightly muddy fields, gravel tracks maybe. When you want to keep up a decent speed but aren't on a grippy surface.

Harry


The advantages of full time 4wd are huge - for example today I was driving some very slippery roads that had patches of tarmac showing through now and again. It certainly didn't warrent diff lock but I know it would have been hard work in a RWD car. With the LR system you only get wind up if you use the diff lock. When I hit the Roman Road I had to use diff lock - virgin snow over sheet ice!!!

Also when you are towing permanent 4wd is much safer.

It sounds to me very much like the old system they had on the Series Land Rovers years ago.
__________________
codprawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 February 2007, 16:10   #8
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: London
Length: no boat
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 378
OK great thanks all. The other obvious question is...

When pulling away in LLR (or HLR) on a slipway say, or on ice - is there any advantage to being in 2nd gear (4 gear auto box, diesel) instead of relying on the auto-box?

Thanks

Rich
__________________
Rich L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 February 2007, 16:13   #9
Member
 
Country: Other
Town: Oakley
Boat name: Zerstörer
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki DF 140
MMSI: 235050131
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 3,931
Its very similar.

I have the same setup on my Frontera. Can be a pain in the not so bad conditions where you only need 4 wheel drive briefly. But I suppose it does save on fuel when in 2 wheel drive mode.

Mine is an absolute b----- to steer at slow speeds in 4 wheel drive on tarmac. In fact you can't steer it.

Looks like a lot of Jap 4 x 4 s favour this setup.
__________________
http://www.xfire.com/download/
Biggles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 February 2007, 16:15   #10
Member
 
Country: Other
Town: Oakley
Boat name: Zerstörer
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki DF 140
MMSI: 235050131
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 3,931
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich L View Post
OK great thanks all. The other obvious question is...

When pulling away in LLR (or HLR) on a slipway say, or on ice - is there any advantage to being in 2nd gear (4 gear auto box, diesel) instead of relying on the auto-box?

Thanks

Rich

Doesn't your vehicle have some sort of system that you can switch in when towing from start off that stops the auto box kicking in to 2nd. My mates Toyota does and it stops the vehicle struggling because the gears have changed too early.
__________________

__________________
http://www.xfire.com/download/
Biggles is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:58.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.