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Old 19 October 2006, 18:25   #21
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Originally Posted by Tomas View Post
What up with that one Codprawn?
http://www.classicboatmuseum.org/collection.html

http://82.110.105.20/allwightonline.com/id176.htm

"During the second world war Uffa conceived the idea of the Airborne Lifeboat, a vessel to be carried beneath aeroplanes and dropped by parachute to survivors of ditched aircraft. Lightly built, with lines that blended to the shape of the planes, the Airbornes had sails, engine, survival kit and instructions on how to sail. Many aircrews owed their lives to Uffa’s invention. Years later he was caught by Eamon Andrews on the television programme “This is Your Life” where many of the airmen that had been rescued were able to thank him. For all his success in the field of yacht racing he maintained that this was his most fulfilling design. (This design is engraved on Uffa's head stone)"

An amazing bloke!!!
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Old 19 October 2006, 21:39   #22
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I met Uffa many years ago during Cowes week when he was crewing for Prince Phillip, A very nice man and surely an ICON of the sailing world.
Sorry, did not mean to "name drop" and the only reason we met was my father was RN and we were therefore allowed in the RYS.
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Old 19 October 2006, 22:09   #23
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No problem - it would have been an honour to meet such a person!!!
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Old 20 October 2006, 08:10   #24
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Thanks both of you

For the comments on the "Fox".

Fresh Breeze was designed by Uffa but the owner passed away before the vessel was launched. After launching in 1955, Uffa cruised the boat for several years and had a miniture piano installed down below. Originally a sloop, she was converted to a ketch rig and sailed for years by a retired British Admiral, eventually passed to an Irishman who sailed the boat to the states where she was purchased by drug runners, confiscated, sold at auction and purchased by me soon after. It was an honor to sail and maintain such a piece of history.

This discussion on "Americans with RIBS" has sort of turned back toward the British Isles but you know as a Yank, every time I look East to your country I see and feel the deep nautical tradition that exists there. I enjoy reading even the mundane posts on this forum for the perspective and language of the sea. One additional side comment is that I guess in keeping with "the old country", you folks seem to operate under very tight regulations where in the states they are relatively loose and in the Caribbean, they don't exist.

I'll step back now and continue reading on the forum.

Cheers!
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Old 20 October 2006, 08:44   #25
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Too tight - they try to control every aspect of your daily life here!!!

Now you come to mention it I suppose the sea is still in most people's blood in this country - after all I think the furthest you can get from the sea is about 70 miles or something. Also the Uk has a longer coastline than the USA....

Don't step back - your posts are great - always nice to know what's going on around the world.
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Old 20 October 2006, 08:49   #26
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Yes,

This has been one of the more interesting threads posted recently. Its been interesting to see what goes on in the USA and how RIBs are perceived over there. I for one can't believe that their aren't places in the US that don't have similar weather patterns to the UK, therefore you'd think we'd all use similar types of boat. Doesn't seem to be the case though and reading this thread has enlightened me as to why.
So yes please continue with the American input.
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Old 20 October 2006, 10:45   #27
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Boats, American Style

Another factor ocurred to me that may influence boat selection in America. I don't know for sure but would hazard to guess that there are far more inland and protected near shore waters in the U.S. The Chesapeake Bay is thirty miles wide and at least a hundred miles long with literally hundreds of navagible tributaries. On the major rivers that feed the Bay, like the James, York, Potomic, Susquahanna and others, one can boat inland all the way to their fall lines some of which are over a hundred miles inland from where they enter the Chesapeake. This creates a large demand for vessels that are not required to be seaworthy in terms of oceanic conditions. There are also literally at least a thousand or so inland lakes, some of which cover a thousand square miles, or more, where conditions are usually more tranquil than even the bays and rivers.

I venture to say that only one out of a hundred boats over here ever pokes it's prow further than 2 miles offshore in the ocean. Those that do are primarily larger sport fishing boats, either privately owned or for hire as charter boats. Even the majority of sailboats are in shore or near shore units.

This is to assume that RIBs are popular due to their sea keeping abilities although give me my 4.7 Searider, let me swap the 50 for a 70 outboard and god give me some flat water and I'll show you some fun. The only flat water in the Virgin Islands is in my commode!
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Old 20 October 2006, 10:50   #28
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Another major factor are tides - some friends once came over from Texas and they were stunned that one day there was loads of water across the bay and the next it was "where has all the water gone"!!!
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Old 20 October 2006, 12:05   #29
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Tides

Yes, you get the tides over there. My old Fresh Breeze was a full keeler, iron all the way to facilitate sitting on the bottom at low water. Hey, we've got tides around here, normal diffferential between high and low is about six inches!

I have been at the Bay of Fundy in SE Canada/Maine and there they have a 29 foot tide. I don't understand all I know about tides....why so high some places, why not others.

I imagine that running against a substantial tide flow with a foul wind can assist one in finding religion.

Never been in UK but I've done extensive canal work in Holland. It is cheaper to rent a 10/12 meter cabin cruiser for a week than to stay in a descent hotel there. I used to pick my boats up in Spakenburg and cruise the whole country. Holland has of course eliminated tides which got them into trouble. All the old buildings in Amsterdam were built on wooden pilings and the tide wash preserved them. When they shut off the N. Sea, all the pilings dried out and began to rot. They have a massive program to crawl under all these thousands of structures to cast and pound new concrete pilings down.

Wouldn't it be good to be heading to your island to get a taste of some cool weather and cruise your canals!!!
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Old 20 October 2006, 12:19   #30
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On paper the Bay of Fundy has the world's highest tide but in practice the Britsol Channel is higher on a regular basis - we get tides of 45' quite often. The Channel Islands like Guernsey and Jersey also have big tides but whereas most of the Bristol Channel area is sand it is all rock so much more dangerous.

It also has a lot to do with weather conditions - surge water from storms and lots of river water can make a big difference.

Also a lot depends on how flat the area is. Interesting point about Holland - often wondered why we don't do the same in the UK but it would destroy some stunning beaches. The Dutch used British steam engines to empty most of their inland areas. The Cruquius engine was the biggest steam engine ever built. It could pump 55,000 gallons a minute!!! That's 360,000 tons a day!!!

http://www.cruquiusmuseum.nl/

We have some lovely canals - 2000 miles still useable apparently.
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