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Old 14 July 2014, 02:34   #101
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So I need to order a new set of bolts and lock washers for the lower gear case unit. Will 316 or 18-8 from Mcmaster do or do these need to be ordered from a Suzuki Dealer?
Should be fairly standard metric bolts. 316 would be ideal, but expensive, I'd guess. 304 (aka 18/8 or 18/10) would be cheaper, not quite as corrosion resistant, but I think it's the "standard" grade of SS hardware for marine use.

Make sure you use some aluminum rated anti-seize on the threads to prevent dissimilar metal corrosion/bonding.

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Old 17 July 2014, 01:30   #102
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If I wanted to put together metric tool kit to keep in the boat for working on my Suzuki, what tools would you suggest?
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Old 17 July 2014, 02:42   #103
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If I wanted to put together metric tool kit to keep in the boat for working on my Suzuki, what tools would you suggest?
It's not as extensive as you think. Working on an outboard in a pitching sea isn't fun!

Get yourself a 1/2" ratchet drive with sockets from 10mm up, preferably in a plastic case. It needs to include a spark plug socket. A set of philips and flat-head screwdrivers, or one of those tools with interchangeable heads. A decent large over-sized flathead screwdriver is invaluable if you ever have to release the power-trim hydraulics to lift the leg. Set of pliers, needle-nose, etc.

I carry spare outboard fuses, bulbs for console instruments, insulation tape, R pins (cable attachment), stainless steel split pin (propeller), dry rag or kitchen towel (cleaning sparks), and of course spare spark plugs.
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Old 17 July 2014, 10:51   #104
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I'll disagree with Spartacus; You aren't going to be doing massive work on the motor at sea, just a bit of tinkering.

A 3/8" ratchet set will be fine, and by checking all the bolts you can reach, you can probably dispense with 3/4 of the sockets. Screwdrivers, and adjustable wrench, vise grips, prop wrench (assuming you carry a spare prop) and 2 x 4, spare prop nut kit, small hammer (works well on unruly passengers, too) and a small multi-meter. Lots of tape (electrical, duct, and silicone) and zip ties. Some spare electrical wire in case you need to kludge together a circuit or bypass a switch, and some stainless wire (safety wire is ideal (for holding stuff out of the way or wiring things together.) Spare plugs, fuel filter, fuses, fluids (I keep a partial quart of motor oil and a small container of hydraulic fluid for steering.)

In truth, it all depends on a) what you think might happen, b) what you think you can repair at sea, and c) how much room you have to carry all that crap.

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Old 17 July 2014, 22:48   #105
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Thanks for the advice fellas! I've also looked at the "what kit do you bring" thread which I found helpful.

Jumping back and forth here. I dropped the lower unit off at a machine shop today because one bolt broke off and another seized and bent. They're going to charge me $100/hr to extract them which could be up to $300 if the bolts don't cooperate. Seems steep but I know I'll break something if I try to extract them because the bolts that were in there were incredibly seized up. Any thoughts on this? Should I leave it with the pros or should I attempt to extract the bolts myself? Frustrating situation. I'm going to be generous with the anti-seeize on the new bolts.
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Old 21 July 2014, 13:13   #106
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The machine shop is asking if all the holes on my DT-40 lower unit are threaded. Does Anyone know? Also does anyone know why the top right and bottom left holes have a cavity around them?

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Old 21 July 2014, 13:38   #107
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I don't know about a Suz specifically, but they are all threaded on every lower unit I've seen. (admittedly only about 6 or 8 total)

I would not use 304 grade stainless, its terrible in salt water. 316 is as good as you can get although the issue (as you have discovered) is dissimilar metal corrosion not corrosion of the bolt itself. The price difference between 304 and 316 is probably less than $1 a bolt.

I would have a machine shop extract them. $100/hr is pretty cheap compared to a new lower unit if you were to crack the casing. If they crack the casing, good luck fighting over who pays for that then...
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Old 21 July 2014, 13:43   #108
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Thanks. I will check what grade I purchased. May have been 18-8. Yes its in a shop and they're $100/hr. They're saying it may take 3-4 hours or more.

On another note. Once they get them out what sealants and lubricants do you recommend when putting it back together. I read the manual and it says to use silicone sealant like Permatex No 2 to create a seal between the lower and upper unit. I'm also confused because they say to lubricate the driveshaft splines with marine grease but they also warn not to grease the top of the driveshaft. Which one is it? What grease is recommended?
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Old 21 July 2014, 13:48   #109
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How about something like this or this?

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Originally Posted by jyasaki View Post
I'll disagree with Spartacus; You aren't going to be doing massive work on the motor at sea, just a bit of tinkering.

A 3/8" ratchet set will be fine, and by checking all the bolts you can reach, you can probably dispense with 3/4 of the sockets. Screwdrivers, and adjustable wrench, vise grips, prop wrench (assuming you carry a spare prop) and 2 x 4, spare prop nut kit, small hammer (works well on unruly passengers, too) and a small multi-meter. Lots of tape (electrical, duct, and silicone) and zip ties. Some spare electrical wire in case you need to kludge together a circuit or bypass a switch, and some stainless wire (safety wire is ideal (for holding stuff out of the way or wiring things together.) Spare plugs, fuel filter, fuses, fluids (I keep a partial quart of motor oil and a small container of hydraulic fluid for steering.)

In truth, it all depends on a) what you think might happen, b) what you think you can repair at sea, and c) how much room you have to carry all that crap.

jky
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Old 21 July 2014, 17:17   #110
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Am I ok with 18-8? Thats what all the local places have. 316 would have to be a Mcmaster order and I would have to wait a week. If I am generous with anti-seeize could I get by with 18-8?

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Should be fairly standard metric bolts. 316 would be ideal, but expensive, I'd guess. 304 (aka 18/8 or 18/10) would be cheaper, not quite as corrosion resistant, but I think it's the "standard" grade of SS hardware for marine use.

Make sure you use some aluminum rated anti-seize on the threads to prevent dissimilar metal corrosion/bonding.

jky
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