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Old 02 January 2016, 02:57   #11
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I'd guess more of us have had a swim doing low 'risk' stuff like getting on and off a pontoon than hitting big waves in a seaway...

In a lock there is not much room for a boat to get its self out of your way...

Need to think about risk of bumping the throttle as you fall out, or bumping it as you move around boat and the bumped throttle being what ejects you.
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Old 02 January 2016, 03:32   #12
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...and make sure it works.
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Old 02 January 2016, 08:27   #13
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Getting back on to the boat at sea may also be not as easy as you think without a step or stirrup of some sort down in the water to put a foot in to give yourself the initial push up.
Worth considering one of the rope emergency boarding ladders which you can access from in the water.
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Old 02 January 2016, 09:34   #14
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The OP has a GRP boarding ladder. If his throttle has a neutral lock then he's unlikely to engage the throttle when moving around the boat. When on passage in a boat of that size, I'd definitely want to be wearing a killcord - a small wave taken badly when tired could have a poor ending - better not to be hunted down by a circling RIB.
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Old 02 January 2016, 14:28   #15
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Getting back on to the boat at sea may also be not as easy as you think without a step or stirrup of some sort down in the water to put a foot in to give yourself the initial push up.
Worth considering one of the rope emergency boarding ladders which you can access from in the water.
or use the cavitation plate on the engine.
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Old 03 January 2016, 04:55   #16
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or use the cavitation plate on the engine.

Got a Permatrim on mine so that gives a nice large secure area to stand on.
Not so sure about smaller engines though.
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Old 03 January 2016, 05:28   #17
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You still need the boat to stop and you to be able swim back to it before needing the step...
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Old 03 January 2016, 06:14   #18
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This "long tether", i really don't get, if your engine is so unreliable that its unlikely to restart why go out solo in the first place. if it starts fine then just turn the engine off, go to the bow/stern do whatever, then come back to the engine and restart.

The only area that may be a pain sometimes is mooring, so i have a mid point elasticated webbing strap on my console which allows me to connect up (whilst wearing the kill cord) then hold me alongside while i go fore and aft to fix bow and stern lines.

If i had a tether long enough to allow me to get to the bow, then it would also be long enough to allow me to get hit by a spinning prop.
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Old 03 January 2016, 07:03   #19
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Starovich, I am with you, an extended kill cord is not a great idea, not least because it's much more likely to get tangled in something and then not work. I'm not quite convinced that relying on neutral lock is enough. It helps but assuming it always gets used might be unwise, and in a current (such as a river) a bit of forward power might be needed to keep the boat in place. Actually whilst the style got a bit of criticism for not being jockey seat I think a bench and offset console like he has means it's about easier to move around a very small boat with less to trip on.

Assuming the throttle is on the correct side it's less likely to get bumped too.


However your webbing strap is the sort of thing I was talking about, and possibly a handy boat hook etc, which avoid the desire to go forward.
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Old 04 January 2016, 12:19   #20
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or use the cavitation plate on the engine.
And the tilt/trim switch to get you up to transom height if you're injured.

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