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Old 01 August 2006, 13:52   #1
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I had a ride in a Canadian Coastguard RIB.........

I got to ride in a Canadian Coastguard RIB t'other day .... as a casualty!
We're sailing for a week out in Bonavista Bay, North Eastern NL & whilst moored at an uninhabited island I went hiking around, buggered over and cut myself badly. A VHF call to the Canadian Coastguard (who provide SAR cover) resulted in a FRC being dispatched to take me to a local hospital to be stitched up.

So I got a ride in a Zodiac Hurricane 733 with twin Opti 150's. Crewed by 4 student coastie auxillaries who were utterly professional, kind, helpful and made me realise that the old adage of 'you know you are getting old when the policemen start looking young' works just as well for other emergency services!

The RIB was configured with 3 jockeys and lots of bags of kit plus many jerricans for fuel for the return trip. (SAR base a couple of hours away from where we were and a good 3 hours back from where I got dropped off to the ambulance.) Ride seemed very comfortable although seas were slight and my mind was slightly pre-occupied.............

Anyway, My thanks to the Canadian Coastguard for the professional and prompt service and now I can say that I've had a ride in a 'proper' RIB over here. Still on the sailing holiday using internet at rural library. Albeit a bit slower as my mouse arm's a bit sore.........
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Old 01 August 2006, 17:32   #2
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No photos? Both arms completely severed then?

Useless wafi!

John

PS Get well soon!
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Old 02 August 2006, 03:50   #3
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Interesting story Allan, glad all is well.
Tends to put the differing concepts of what constitutes a rescue situation into perspective.
Being three hours by rib and probably ten times that in a yacht from a hospital does highlight just how remote you are and how necessary the SAR service is.
Whereas in the UK you would be lucky to be 3 minute from someone trying to help whether you wanted it or not

How bigger area did your CCG rib cover Des
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Old 04 November 2006, 02:27   #4
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Whereas in the UK you would be lucky to be 3 minute from someone trying to help whether you wanted it or not
And he was on the "busy" side of Newfoundland! I spent a few weeks touring around the left coast of the island and saw the same 12 tourists for the three weeks I was there! (Although, never at one time!) On the other hand, I saw 22 moose (mooses?) wandering around!
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Old 04 November 2006, 13:14   #5
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extra fuel

Interesting that they have to carry extra fuel cans (too). I would think that hurricane has an internal fuel tank? ... I've used 4-strokes for the last 10+ years and for any doubters, you really CAN save 30-50% fuel.

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Old 05 November 2006, 12:25   #6
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Interesting that they have to carry extra fuel cans (too). I would think that hurricane has an internal fuel tank? ... I've used 4-strokes for the last 10+ years and for any doubters, you really CAN save 30-50% fuel.
I believe the 733 holds about 500 litres of fuel, including the aux. tank. That seems like a lot of fuel, but if they are running twin 150s, they would burn through that without much trouble. On my 50, the tank is 132 litres, which only gives me a range of perhaps 75 to 80 miles, so I always carry a couple of extra tanks (50 litres total) and, if I need more, I'll toss on a few Jerry cans to boot. Too bad you can't fill the tubes with gas!

I blew the head on my 2-stroke 150 last season and I really debated spending the $8000 to replace it vs. the $17000 for a new 4-stroke. Since the old engine was worth nothing blown up, I opted to fix it, but I might try to trade it in next season... although I suppose I'll be lucky to get the cost of the repair out of it!`
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Old 06 November 2006, 14:29   #7
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You wanted pictures.....

I'll spare you the a pic of the scar, but attached is the best I can do with windows live to map the area. It's all a bit crude but I reckon the CG Rib had a good 50 mile run from it's base to where I was. They then had 25-30 miles from Braggs Island to Valleyfield where the ambulance was waiting. Finally they had to return to their base. At night. So total round trip in the order of 150 miles? That would equate to somewhere in the order of 400l of fuel required. Not sure whether they do have 500l under deck but they sure as hell were carrying fuel cans above deck to give them the range and contingency! (Which presumably could include getting another 'shout' whilst on their way back from this one.)

Anyway, as I say, I was immensely grateful for their assistance and fortunate that they were there. (The station is only manned from June-Oct). I guess if the injury had been any more serious or the place any more remote I'dve either been in serious trouble or having a ride in a helicopter! The lesson learned, apart from trying not to bugger over in the first place, is don't count on immediate assistance if you boating takes you out into the less populated parts of the world.

The other pic btw is a file pic of the wharf at Braggs Island. The spot I fell down is basically in the centre bottom edge of the pic. The buildings you see are summer homes / fishing camps and not inhabited year round.
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Old 07 November 2006, 13:22   #8
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Geez;

Some guys will do anything to get a ride on a RIB...

Glad you weren't seriously injured.

jky
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