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Old 29 November 2006, 21:45   #1
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Boat Safety Categories

Hello!

Why doesn't the U.S. have a clear cut safety designation for boats like the Recreational Craft Directive? Its simple Category A,B,C and D. I have done search upon search and all I get is ISO and NMMA ceritfication but no explanation as to which boat is held to which standard. If a boat is made in Europe the CE category is accepted into the U.S. but how do you know if a boat made in the U.S. is even Category C rated? I have a Cat C RIB and looking to buy a Cat B.

--Chris
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Old 29 November 2006, 23:45   #2
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On the face of it the system is great BUT like all things in life it's not as simple as that.

For a start the makers decide what cat there boat is in. This means you can have a 3.1m SIB with a C rating - also a 9m RIB can have the same C rating - stupid!!!

If you know boats just looking at it should tell you what it's capable of. Bigger is usually better. On a sailing boat for example the more keel there is under the water the better for rough seas.
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Old 30 November 2006, 01:24   #3
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Originally Posted by dawktah View Post
Hello!
Why doesn't the U.S. have a clear cut safety designation for boats like the Recreational Craft Directive?
Can't say I know what the Recreational Craft Directive is, but most incidents at sea are attributable to the pilot rather than the vessel.

Quote:
I have done search upon search and all I get is ISO and NMMA ceritfication but no explanation as to which boat is held to which standard.
NMMA certs are voluntary, I think (not sure what the ISO cert you're talking about is.) Sort of like the ISO9000/9001/9002 bullcrap that industry went through a few years ago. The boats are not "held" to the standard, per se; rather they are designed and manufactured per the suggestions of the Assoc.

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If a boat is made in Europe the CE category is accepted into the U.S. but how do you know if a boat made in the U.S. is even Category C rated?
You don't. The CE rating is a European thing. Not required in the US, so they're not classified (at least, I've never seen it.)

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Old 30 November 2006, 02:50   #4
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Funny how these things all show up at the same time.

Found this on the other forum I read after I replied above.

http://www.thehulltruth.com/forums/t...26731&posts=19


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Old 30 November 2006, 16:32   #5
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Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
This means you can have a 3.1m SIB with a C rating - also a 9m RIB can have the same C rating - stupid!!!
why is that intrinsically stupid? if the boat manufacturer says a boat is NOT suitable for conditions then maybe its not!
Quote:
If you know boats just looking at it should tell you what it's capable of. Bigger is usually better.
mmmmm..... not necessarily so - which is presumably why the RCD came about in the first place - otherwise the length would be the "class".

Oh by the way - I am not claiming that the RCD is actually good, or classification a reliable guide. Just that "size isn't everything".
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Old 30 November 2006, 16:44   #6
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why is that intrinsically stupid? if the boat manufacturer says a boat is NOT suitable for conditions then maybe its not!
mmmmm..... not necessarily so - which is presumably why the RCD came about in the first place - otherwise the length would be the "class".

Oh by the way - I am not claiming that the RCD is actually good, or classification a reliable guide. Just that "size isn't everything".
The boat makers are trying to cover their own arses - nothing more. Some less scrupulous ones go the other way and over rate their boats to make them sell better - either way it renders the whole system pretty pointless.

i have seen some very capable big RIBs that have the same C cat as my Quicksilver 3.1m - that's like comparing a Ferrari with a Reliant Robin.

Agreed it's not always down to size but when comparing 2 similar kinds of boat it is.

Take for example a Princess 30 and a Princess 60 - both planing craft etc but the 60 would take the waves better. Then compare the Princess 60 with an old fashioned sailing boat - 22' long but narrow beam and a full deep keel - obviously the 22' sailing boat would be far more at home mid Atlantic.
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Old 05 December 2006, 13:06   #7
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Ratings

Strange, The European system has set categories:

Category A - Ocean.
Extended voyages with wind force in excess of Beaufort force 8, and significant wave height of 4 metres or above.

Category B Offshore
Offshore voyages in possible wind force of Beaufort force 8 and significant wave heights of up to 4 metres.

Category C Inshore
Voyages on coastal waters, large lakes, bays estuaries, or rivers, where wind force of up to force 6 on the Beaufort scale and significant wave heights of up to 2 metres may be experienced.

Category D Sheltered waters
Designed for voyages on sheltered inland waterways, including lakes, rivers and canals, where wind force 4 and significant wave height of 0.5 metres may be experienced

NMMA doesn't seem to have "published" figures...?
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Old 05 December 2006, 15:08   #8
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The system is easy enough to understand - it's the way it's implemented that is the problem!!!
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Old 05 December 2006, 17:31   #9
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Great for Europeans! However in the US. either its NMMA certified or not, which means what, as they don't even give you categories? As one of the other posters said some good boats are and some aren't but at least should have some parameter to go by would be nice. I guess I'll stick to getting the RedBay
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