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Old 18 September 2015, 17:40   #11
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Country: USA
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Boat name: Mick 1, McRIB
Make: Willard
Length: 7m +
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Typical corrosion. Wire brush and some paint will make it look better. If it's functional change the part or bolt or whatever. It's a good engine for that boat. It's likely low time and if improved and maintained it will last for a long time.
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Old 19 September 2015, 14:18   #12
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Typical corrosion. Wire brush and some paint will make it look better. If it's functional change the part or bolt or whatever. It's a good engine for that boat. It's likely low time and if improved and maintained it will last for a long time.

Thanks. As much as I want to pick up a new Suzuki 250 and mount it on a bracket, I will leave the diesel engine in there and give it a try. I know for sure that the trim seals are leaking on the outdrive so I wanted to have some reassurance that the motor was worth keeping if I go ahead and start to open up the checkbook for rerigging everything.

I will update here once I get this thing on the water!
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Old 19 September 2015, 14:52   #13
zip
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Wing has tubes, but if you are looking to save some money, maybe Todd?

A 250? Seriously? That's a hell of a lot of motor for that boat. What's maximum rated hp for that vessel?
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Old 19 September 2015, 15:52   #14
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I built a 640 and put a 250 Suzuki on it and it was not to much power at all. She ran around 46 knots. The boat had the same diesel and we pulled it and built a 32" extension and all was well in the land.
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Old 19 September 2015, 17:09   #15
zip
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That's fast!
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Old 19 September 2015, 17:58   #16
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46 knots? I will start pulling this motor out now
Ryan, if you weren't on this forum, I would probably be completely satisfied with my Avon SR4. Watching your builds makes me want bigger and better.

I wanted to try twin Honda 90s since I have one already, but figured it might be too heavy and not enough power. The zuke 250 weighs the same as their 200 so why not.
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Old 19 September 2015, 18:06   #17
zip
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I hope everything works on my boat cuz purchase price pretty much tapped me out. Couldn't afford a repower. Wicked sick right now, but hope to be on the water next weekend.
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Old 19 September 2015, 18:11   #18
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LOL, sorry

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46 knots? I will start pulling this motor out now
Ryan, if you weren't on this forum, I would probably be completely satisfied with my Avon SR4. Watching your builds makes me want bigger and better.

I wanted to try twin Honda 90s since I have one already, but figured it might be too heavy and not enough power. The zuke 250 weighs the same as their 200 so why not.
Its a great boat either way only driving force is speed, which most people dont need. My personal boat im building im doing a single 300 so i burn less gas than twins, and have more room on the stern to get in and out of the water.
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Old 19 September 2015, 19:51   #19
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tworotorturbo, 46 knots?? How often could you use that speed unless you're deep in the bay?

I was in a friend's H733 today and it was pretty nice offshore (way offshore... Then south into Mexico). Even though he can do 53 mph with his twin Yamaha 150 4-strokes, guess where we cruised? 29 mph.... Right where I ran the Willard which had a top speed of 36 mph.
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Old 19 September 2015, 20:03   #20
zip
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Guessing you were with JP? What were you guys doing down there?
I would love to be able to cruise at that speed. Maybe when you get a chance you can give me some tips on the finer parts of the tilt/trim switches.
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