Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 10 February 2015, 15:38   #1
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Plymouth
Boat name: PML EXPLORER
Make: RibCraft
Length: 6m +
Engine: twin 90hp Outboards
MMSI: 235086628
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 15
Where to mount my transducer

I am hoping that someone will be able to advise me as to where the best place to mount my transom mounted transducer is, I know on the transom?

I have a Ribcraft 6.8m with twin Suzuki outboards and I was thinking that the best place was just to the port side of the keel. I have attached a picture to this post as it might help to visualise the locations.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_6723.jpg
Views:	332
Size:	134.4 KB
ID:	102857  
__________________

__________________
j.fishwick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 February 2015, 16:13   #2
Member
 
Phil M's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Whitehaven
Boat name: Pegasus
Make: Zodiac Pro 530
Length: 5m +
Engine: 115hp Merc 4st
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 337
Garmin say "On twin-drive boats, mount the transducer between the drives, if possible." and as close to the centreline as possible. On that instruction, I'd go bang in the middle unless it will get destroyed by your trailer.

Phil M
__________________

__________________
Phil M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 February 2015, 16:28   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Plymouth
Boat name: PML EXPLORER
Make: RibCraft
Length: 6m +
Engine: twin 90hp Outboards
MMSI: 235086628
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 15
Thanks for your reply Phil. I should probably have mentioned that she is normally kept on a drive on versa dock so I was thinking just off the centre line. As my outboards are only 90Hp they are not counter rotating so if I move to the port side of the centre line then the port engine will be on the down stroke, which is what is recommended.

It was suggested to me that I should mount on the starboard side of the starboard engine but I think it will be difficult to get the transducer into turbulence free water and possibly a bit close to water surface.
__________________
j.fishwick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 February 2015, 14:20   #4
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Oakland CA
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,653
Quote:
Originally Posted by j.fishwick View Post
It was suggested to me that I should mount on the starboard side of the starboard engine but I think it will be difficult to get the transducer into turbulence free water and possibly a bit close to water surface.
Not sure what you mean by close to the water surface. The water surface, at speed, will be at the level of the hull.

jky
__________________
jyasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 February 2015, 15:51   #5
AJ.
RIBnet supporter
 
AJ.'s Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Warwickshire
Boat name: Impulse
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki 140
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,020
Why don't you put it in the transom well glue it down with a thick layer of silicone make sure to mix it to get rid of any air bubbles. That's where mine is and works perfectly at any speed and you don't have to worry about knocking it or it flipping up at speed


Sent from my iPhone using RIB Net
__________________
AJ. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 February 2015, 15:51   #6
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: Wildheart
Make: Humber/Delta Seasafe
Length: 5m +
Engine: Merc 60 Clamshell
MMSI: 235068449
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,611
If you mount the transducer on a bit of 2x1 or metric equivalent then use a G clamp on the othrr end to park it in the different locations by clamping it to the transom. When you find the best, fit it properly.
__________________
9D280 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 February 2015, 16:31   #7
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Plymouth
Boat name: PML EXPLORER
Make: RibCraft
Length: 6m +
Engine: twin 90hp Outboards
MMSI: 235086628
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 15
Jky,

My understanding, and I could be wrong, is that when the rib gets on the plane and is travelling at speed then the hull will lift in the water so the higher on the V (further away from the centre line) you place the transducer then it could potentially lift out of the water altogether or be in the turbulent aerated surface water. Therefore the closer you go towards the keel then the more assurance you have that the transducer is in 'clean' water passing down the hull, especially during any turns.
__________________
j.fishwick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 February 2015, 16:38   #8
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Plymouth
Boat name: PML EXPLORER
Make: RibCraft
Length: 6m +
Engine: twin 90hp Outboards
MMSI: 235086628
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 15
AJ.
My previous transducer was glued into the base of the bilge, just in front of the transom, but we never had that much success with it. We lost the signal a higher end speeds and had always been suspicious of it's accuracy. This could be due, in part, to it not being glued as you describe and that it was an inferior transducer. Also it always seemed to get stood on by people when sorting ropes at the stern. As my vessel is used for scientific research and up shallow tributaries then precise depth is desirable so for these reasons I have decided to transom mount my new transducer.
__________________
j.fishwick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 February 2015, 16:39   #9
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Plymouth
Boat name: PML EXPLORER
Make: RibCraft
Length: 6m +
Engine: twin 90hp Outboards
MMSI: 235086628
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 15
9D280,

Thank you for your suggestion, I may give it a go and see how I get on.
__________________
j.fishwick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14 February 2015, 13:37   #10
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Oakland CA
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,653
Quote:
Originally Posted by j.fishwick View Post
Jky,

My understanding, and I could be wrong, is that when the rib gets on the plane and is travelling at speed then the hull will lift in the water so the higher on the V (further away from the centre line) you place the transducer then it could potentially lift out of the water altogether or be in the turbulent aerated surface water. Therefore the closer you go towards the keel then the more assurance you have that the transducer is in 'clean' water passing down the hull, especially during any turns.
True, to an extent. The hull shape, however, is the "surface" of the water at speed, from the keel to wherever the boat waterline rides while on plane. To put that another way, the "surface at the back of boat while running is the keel at midline, and several inches higher as you move towards the gunwales. The only way you'll lift the transducer out of the water is to mount it a few inches over from the waterline at speed.

The clean water part has more to do with other things than strictly depth: What's on the hull further forward (chines, other transducers, thru-hulls, and the like) and what interference you get from other things nearby (other in-water sensors, spinning props, etc.)

jky
__________________

__________________
jyasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 13:51.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.