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Old 18 November 2010, 12:01   #1
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Waterproofing a PL259 VHF Connection

Hi, I have just bought a Icom M411 VHF and Iím planning on fitting it on the side of my SR4 console.

The whole unit will be exposed and although it is supposed to be waterproof the PL259 plug on the back will also be exposed. Is it as simple as wrapping the connection in electrical insulation tape? And is there anything else I need to consider?

Thanks in advance.
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Old 18 November 2010, 14:10   #2
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I think you'll find self-amalgamating tape is a much better option. If done well, it'll be practically waterproof.
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Old 18 November 2010, 14:31   #3
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I would also stuff the plug with silicone grease. Put in so much that when you apply it to the radio, it spews out of the back of the plug.
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Old 18 November 2010, 14:36   #4
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I would also stuff the plug with silicone grease. Put in so much that when you apply it to the radio, it spews out of the back of the plug.
As silicone grease is an insulator, I would be very carefull where it is "stuffed" you would not want to insulate all the conecting surfaces !!
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Old 18 November 2010, 14:53   #5
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As silicone grease is an insulator, I would be very carefull where it is "stuffed" you would not want to insulate all the conecting surfaces !!
Probably better than using a conductive grease, which may create a short
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Old 18 November 2010, 14:56   #6
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Probably better than using a conductive grease, which may create a short
Totally agree however in the wrong place could be equally useless !!!
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Old 18 November 2010, 15:04   #7
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Probably better than using a conductive grease, which may create a short
At the risk of getting totally anorak,

The reason to use silicone grease in huge quantities is that, where there is a void, water will get in. If there is something in there already, such as grease, water is LESS LIKELY to get in.

Conducting surfaces are designed to scrape or rub together.

If a connector is designed correctly using grease should only help.
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Old 18 November 2010, 15:45   #8
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Thanks for all the advice

What about moderately using some silicone on the threads and at the back of the connection and then covering it with hot melt glue from a glue gun a bit like a made to measure rubber cover. Then wrap the whole thing in self-amalgamating tape?

I’ve seen some PCB’s covered in hot melt glue to keep them waterproof.
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Old 18 November 2010, 15:48   #9
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Silicone grease and adhesive lined heatshrink is how we do it. One of our boats done that way has been like it for 5 + years with no Problems at all.
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Old 18 November 2010, 16:02   #10
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At the risk of getting totally anorak,

The reason to use silicone grease in huge quantities is that, where there is a void, water will get in. If there is something in there already, such as grease, water is LESS LIKELY to get in.

Conducting surfaces are designed to scrape or rub together.

If a connector is designed correctly using grease should only help.
I agree

This stuff is designed for aerial sealing:

http://www.saltyjohn.co.uk/bandit-silicone-tape.htm
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