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Old 02 February 2010, 04:31   #1
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Radar reflectors, do they really work?

http://www.panbo.com/archives/2007/0...ally_work.html

Do they or don't they.

Do you have one on your rib ??
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Old 02 February 2010, 05:19   #2
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The small diameter tube types certainly aren't worth it.

A passive unit like the Echomax or Tri-Lens models is better than not having one at all, as the Qinetiq tests have shown. At least with a motor boat you can ignore the heeling factor applied to sail.

Obviously with a reasonably well-powered boat, you have more ability to manoeuvre out of a potential incident that under sail.

Since the Ouzo report, Echomax have also introduced an active unit which retails at less than the Sea-Me. It is better specified and uses less power. There's also a waterproof control box available for open boat use.

Whether it's worthwhile for the sort of boating you do is a personal decision based on type of boat, where you go, likely traffic etc. As often said, there is no substitute for an effective watch.

(and yes, I have a vested interest in supplying these units)
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Old 02 February 2010, 05:46   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeCC View Post
The small diameter tube types certainly aren't worth it.

A passive unit like the Echomax or Tri-Lens models is better than not having one at all, as the Qinetiq tests have shown. At least with a motor boat you can ignore the heeling factor applied to sail.

Obviously with a reasonably well-powered boat, you have more ability to manoeuvre out of a potential incident that under sail.

Since the Ouzo report, Echomax have also introduced an active unit which retails at less than the Sea-Me. It is better specified and uses less power. There's also a waterproof control box available for open boat use.

Whether it's worthwhile for the sort of boating you do is a personal decision based on type of boat, where you go, likely traffic etc. As often said, there is no substitute for an effective watch.

(and yes, I have a vested interest in supplying these units)

I fish probably no more than 3 or 4 miles off shore.
See a few big ships a bit further out maybe 3 miles or so.
I have one of those tiny plastic tubes not yet fitted .
so I don't realy know if I need one or not.

Short fishing trips lasting 5 to 6 hours.
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Old 02 February 2010, 07:27   #4
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I fish probably no more than 3 or 4 miles off shore.
See a few big ships a bit further out maybe 3 miles or so.
I have one of those tiny plastic tubes not yet fitted .
so I don't realy know if I need one or not.

Short fishing trips lasting 5 to 6 hours.
some of the plastic tube types are not as good as they look even though they may say they are approved ect ,,,,in reality most dont seem to live up to their expectations ,,if you are operating in TEES/Hartlepool bays you need some sort of reflecter even a old octaheadral type, and with the amount of commercial shipping ,think last year was 3rd busiest port in uk . plus the Newcastle to Holland ferrrys ect further out .. its also a good area for getting sudden fog/seafretts that can come down suddenly .
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Old 02 February 2010, 07:37   #5
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Old 02 February 2010, 08:08   #6
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The main thing to remember is that no matter how high tech your reflector / active widjet is, it's only as good as the person on watch on the bridge of the ship bearing down on you....
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Old 02 February 2010, 08:18   #7
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Under the colregs, you should have a reflector fitted if practicably possible. I can't think of many ribs that wouldn't be able to fit one some way or another. Interestingly though, the Qinetiq test showed that none of the passive reflectors on the market at the time actually complied with all the minimum standards. I chose the tri-lens which is compact waterproof and got a generally good rating.
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Old 02 February 2010, 08:37   #8
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something

Quote:
Originally Posted by m chappelow View Post
some of the plastic tube types are not as good as they look even though they may say they are approved ect ,,,,in reality most dont seem to live up to their expectations ,,if you are operating in TEES/Hartlepool bays you need some sort of reflecter even a old octaheadral type, and with the amount of commercial shipping ,think last year was 3rd busiest port in uk . plus the Newcastle to Holland ferrrys ect further out .. its also a good area for getting sudden fog/seafretts that can come down suddenly .
Well as you say required in this area.
I suppose something is better than nothing.

It's going on the rib.
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Old 02 February 2010, 09:05   #9
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Well as you say required in this area.
I suppose something is better than nothing.

It's going on the rib.
one of the sailing lads in the club went across to Denmark few years back .lost his reflector over the side half way back ,, so he came back with a plaggy blag and a few squished beer cans worked quite well acording to the pilot cutter .
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Old 02 February 2010, 09:09   #10
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so he came back with a plaggy blag and a few squished beer cans worked quite well acording to the pilot cutter .
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