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Old 19 July 2017, 19:42   #1
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overcharging ?

hi all
i have a mariner 40 hp outboard and tested the charging system and on high revs it is pushing out 18 volts i understand that a 12v system can charge up to 14.5 volts so is my rectifier gone any help would be great
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Old 19 July 2017, 19:52   #2
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how did you measure it?
What voltage at lower revs?
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Old 19 July 2017, 20:05   #3
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hi thanks for reply
i have a volt reader on boat and volts start at 14 at low revs
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Old 19 July 2017, 20:17   #4
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Has it changed? What was it previously?
Where is that voltage measured? Have you measured at the battery with a voltmeter?
How big is the battery? Does it get warm? Does it emit bubbles in the cells (if you can see them)
Unlikely to be a rectifier issue - that is unlikely to increase the voltage. I don't know what the circuit consists of - it could have a voltage regulator that's packed up. Pence to replace if you're handy with a soldering iron
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Old 20 July 2017, 03:13   #5
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Stick a multimeter on the battery terminals with the engine running & measure the voltage there.
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Old 20 July 2017, 03:17   #6
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charge output of 40hp Page: 1 - iboats Boating Forums | 137031

for info
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Old 20 July 2017, 07:59   #7
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You didn't say how old the engine is. Older engines only had a rectifier and no regulator. Basically used the battery to regulate the voltage, boils them a bit but the idea was, you could always top them up. Seeing 18 volts (floating) on this would be normal
This setup shouldn't be used with sealed leisure batteries as it will quickly destroy them.

I think it was about 1990 (I could be wrong) that everyone started fitting regulators to their charging systems to facilitate the use of leisure/gel batteries. Should show about 14.3 volts "on load".
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