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Old 19 September 2013, 06:39   #1
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New Project - Console Re-Wire

Hi, im thinking of doing a complete re-wire of my console, I have a fault with my VHF that cuts out when I go to transmit plus ive been thinking about fitting a new chart plotter and as ive had a good look in the console the wirring seems to be a tad messy and the usual crap of salt and dirt etc, plus the fues box and where everything connects up is not upto par in my opinion im thinking of stripping all the electronics out, fitting a new fuse box and connector box and re wirring / tidying up and etc etc.

So any tips and tricks greatly appreciated before I start.

Plus any recomendations on good quality marine fuse box/connector boxes products on the market.

Will take pictures and notes and do a write up of my little project as it proceeds.
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Old 19 September 2013, 06:58   #2
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For tinned cable, adhesive-lined heat-shrink, connectors, et al, I can personally recommend Vehicle Wiring Products in Derbyshire. Been a satisfied customer for 15 years +
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Old 19 September 2013, 09:33   #3
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Adhesive lined heatshrink is your friend
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Old 19 September 2013, 14:28   #4
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Tinned cable essential.

Clear labeling essential.

Use circuit breakers not fuses.

Do not use adhesive holders for zip ties, must be screwed to base is they are to last.

Use good quality pliers to clamp on terminals.

Ensure cable is adequate for application. If in doubt go bigger.

Fit a battery isolator.

Use flexible conduit to keep things tidy.

Problem with VHF is probably poor joint. Solder whereever possible.

Use a commoning post for negative return.

Use a multiple terminal strip (stainless) to make data connections.

Do not use any choc blocks, anywhere, never. They will fail sooner rather than later.

Be tidy.

Get everything to hand before you start.

Plan cable runs as far as possible. If an additional cable is required in a previous run, unclip it and remake bunch. Do not clip cable on side of original bunch. Better still use conduit.

If, like me, you are not as supple as you once were, press gang children or grand children! Invaluable in tight spaces!

A neat wiring job is very satisfying!
Good luck
Ian

Sent from my HTC One X using Rib.net
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Old 20 September 2013, 11:06   #5
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Quote:
Do not use adhesive holders for zip ties, must be screwed to base is they are to last.

Use good quality pliers to clamp on terminals.
If you do need to use adhesive wall mounts for zip ties, give the adhesive a wash with acetone first (quick gentle wipe on and allow to flash off); it activates the adhesive and makes it stick a lot better. I use about 6 them to hold my transducer cable to the aluminum hull, and they've lasted over 5 years with a single failure.

Rather than pliers, get a good set of crimpers (not the stamped sheet metal ones.) Pricey for a good set, but worth the money in the long run.

jky
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Old 20 September 2013, 11:12   #6
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Everyone else pretty much covered it...

Quote:
Originally Posted by j.i.wilson View Post
Do not use any choc blocks, anywhere, never. They will fail sooner rather than later.
But what is a "choc block"? Never heard that term around here before nor seen it in any North American catalogs etc.
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Old 20 September 2013, 11:40   #7
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Choc block is a strip of plastic connectors that look like a bar of chocolate. Each terminal block has a cable entry on each side with a screw on top to secure the cable. Not to be used on boats as the screws will vibrate free and corrode.
Use crimps with a crimping tool and give each one a good tug to ensure its secure. Cover with a heat shrink sleave.
Good luck
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Old 20 September 2013, 11:50   #8
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you can good deals on the adhesive lined heat shrink butt connectors and other connectors on Ebay here in the states.

Jason
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Old 20 September 2013, 12:07   #9
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Choc block
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Old 20 September 2013, 12:41   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by postie View Post


Choc block
Thanks for that. Guess its a good thing I have never seen one on a boat, I know I've seen one before in a store somewhere. Maybe for home entertainment/stereo? In general I'd say a wire to screw connection like that is only common in the States for static connections in a house. Wire to circuit breaker connections in a house use something similar, but its typically solid wire (not stranded) and unless there's an earthquake, no vibrations.

On boats this is the norm. With a heat shinked crimped ring terminal on the ends of the wire. (No wrapping the wire around the screw!)

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