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Old 30 July 2015, 06:24   #21
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The Nexus 7 works reasonably well on my rib. The screen is possibly not quite as sunlight readable as the Garmin, but it is so much more user-friendly, and the charts so much better that I find I look at it much more than the Garmin. Mind you the Garmin is not mounted in a great position for the helmsman in my rib, and it has a very narrow viewing angle. I still use it for the sounder / fishfinder, and of course it is a get-you-home should the Nexus fail. I also have Navionics on my iphone, oh - and I carry paper charts as well.......

The Nexus setup I have is not a fully waterproof case, and the power connector is definitely not. It is more splash proof I would say. Time will tell if I need to do something better. I do not leave it on the boat, but take it home.
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Old 30 July 2015, 06:32   #22
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Much appreciated!

Regards the cost thing...I want a large screen without doubt. That is a priority along with reliability (software as physical issues have easy solutions). The ease of simple app updates and upgrades at much lower costs is also very enticing.

My phone is 5 inch screen and I find it too small for my liking when trying to look at lots of info at quick glance such as sat nav.

The little Raymarine Dragonfly 6 I've been offered SH has a 5.7 screen I think. I had a quick play with it...lovely, sharp screen, love the toggle...but I found the screen tiny for all the info being crammed on there.


It seems that something with a larger screen gets into serious money. All the chatter online about this ipad/tablet thing gave me the impression that its all starting to look quite 'together' as a concept. Especially this Raymarine WI FISH addition with its apps to tie the system together giving the option of split displays on a large screen tablet/ipad. It definitely looks impressive from where I am standing.

But agreed...if it doesn't work well out on the water then that's no good.

I used to have a little Motorola Defy phone. It was waterproof. I didn't even have a case on it. Took it kayaking sea and lake. It got soaked dozens of times. Accidentially lost it when working, only to find it buried under wet clay 3 days later. It was in my pocket climbing in all weathers. The little phone was just constantly wet and covered in dirt. Dropped it countless times. Finally cracked the screen after dropping too many times. But the phone never gave up...

With this in mind, one of the submersible hard cases should do a good job of keeping moisture out.

Been looking at android tablets too and there is just tins to choose from with 3/4g and big memory for not a lot of money.

Price wise the IPAD/TABLET option is a pure winner.

But its just good to get current user feedback as most online negatives seem to focus on the same things...battery, waterproofing, glare etc. All of which I don't see as an issue due to the solutions being right there.

The touchscreen...yes that's the only thing I cant find a solution to.

My friend advised me this morning that his dad has been plying with a tablet mounted outside on his Sea Hog. He's going to give me a call today with his thoughts on it all. Surprised me that actually...as he is definitely not a tech minded fella!
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Old 30 July 2015, 06:34   #23
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Starovich, Do you really think people on here have never had a pad or large smartphone on a boat?

I have on my boat 2 chart plotters plus my 10" pad with navionics I sometimes use (I like gadgets). One of my chart plotters is a Garmin 7" touchscreen and the other is a 5" traditional buttoned unit.

If anyone has experience of all walks of gps on a RIB and has a right in your eyes to speak about it, then I may slightly qualify....should one need to ofcourse.

1. No one said a pad won't work?

2. Fact is whether we like it or not, pads are not designed for the vibrations or conditions. See number 1 though!

3. vibrations/conditions from a bike and boat are chalk and cheese. The frequencies involved are vastly different. See number 1 though!

4. Cost wise there is nothing between a pad and a dedicated unit for sonar/chartplotter.

5. Pad offers better value for money, especially if used for other things. Screen wise it will blow the dedi away.

6. Pad won't send DSC info to vhf if that is a concern, can buy vhf with inbuilt these days if required though.

7. Pad can't connect to NMEA if that is a concern

8. Most chart plotters come with a 3 year warranty for this environment if that is a concern.

9. Pad isn't as easy to read in daylight, even with the screen adapters, very usable though.

10. Touchscreen isn't easy to adjust on the move, buttons are.

11. No one here has tried sonar yet with the pad, looks good though.

12. There is no way on earth WiFi is better than a cable to a dedicated unit for any info.

13. Shop about for chart plotters, I spent 30 seconds and found one. They do normally come with charts but you can upgrade should you want. Could spend as little as 150 quid if you wish.

14. The pad mapping and fish finder look as good if not better than similar priced dedi units.

Conclusion to all this, no one is right or wrong and my opinion is just as good or bad as yours, if you don't like it then another one will be along in a minute.

I also predict within 5 years most leisure boaters will be using something like this instead of dedi units, it will only get better over time.

David, in your position and for your use I would personally try the pad I think. Worst case scenario you have a pad to watch "things" on...can't be a bad thing! Haha

Cheers
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Old 30 July 2015, 06:42   #24
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Starovich, Do you really think people on here have never had a pad or large smartphone on a boat?

I have on my boat 2 chart plotters plus my 10" pad with navionics I sometimes use (I like gadgets). One of my chart plotters is a Garmin 7" touchscreen and the other is a 5" traditional buttoned unit.

If anyone has experience of all walks of gps on a RIB and has a right in your eyes to speak about it, then I may slightly qualify....should one need to ofcourse.

1. No one said a pad won't work.

2. Fact is whether you like it or not, pads are not designed for the vibrations or conditions. See number 1 though!

3. vibrations/conditions from a bike and boat are chalk and cheese. The frequencies involved are vastly different. See number 1 though!

4. Cost wise there is nothing between a pad and a dedicated unit for sonar/chartplotter.

5. Pad offers better value for money, especially if used for other things. Screen wise it will blow the dedi away.

6. Pad won't send DSC info to vhf if that is a concern, can buy vhf with inbuilt these days if required though.

7. Pad can't connect to NMEA if that is a concern

8. Most chart plotters come with a 3 year warranty for this environment if that is a concern.

9. Pad isn't as easy to read in daylight, even with the screen adapters, very usable though. (Oh, I have one of those too before you ask)

10. Touchscreen isn't easy to adjust on the move, buttons are.

11. No one here has tried sonar yet with the pad, looks good though.

12. There is no way on earth WiFi is better than a cable to a dedicated unit for any info.

13. Shop about for chart plotters, I spent 30 seconds and found one. They do normally come with charts but you can upgrade should you want. Could spend as little as 150 quid if you wish.

14. The pad mapping and fish finder look as good if not better than similar priced dedi units.

Conclusion to all this, no one is right or wrong and my opinion is just as good or bad as yours, if you don't like it then another one will be along in a minute.

I also predict within 5 years most leisure boaters will be using something like this instead of dedi units, it will only get better over time.

Cheers
I appreciate this...some very valid points I hadnt even considered. Looking possibly like this is going to be a divided opinion subject.

If anybody reads this that is actively trying out ipad/tablet combined with the new sonar box thingys, please do share your experiences.

I'm seriously considering going for it.
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Old 30 July 2015, 06:45   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bucksribster View Post
The Nexus 7 works reasonably well on my rib. The screen is possibly not quite as sunlight readable as the Garmin, but it is so much more user-friendly, and the charts so much better that I find I look at it much more than the Garmin. Mind you the Garmin is not mounted in a great position for the helmsman in my rib, and it has a very narrow viewing angle. I still use it for the sounder / fishfinder, and of course it is a get-you-home should the Nexus fail. I also have Navionics on my iphone, oh - and I carry paper charts as well.......

The Nexus setup I have is not a fully waterproof case, and the power connector is definitely not. It is more splash proof I would say. Time will tell if I need to do something better. I do not leave it on the boat, but take it home.
The screen looks noticeably big in that pic...I like it.
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Old 30 July 2015, 06:48   #26
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These forums are great...it ain't that long ago that I would have had a fortnights effort to try and get instant feeback and advice before the internet took over world! It definitely isn't all bad.
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Old 30 July 2015, 07:05   #27
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I appreciate this...some very valid points I hadnt even considered. Looking possibly like this is going to be a divided opinion subject.

If anybody reads this that is actively trying out ipad/tablet combined with the new sonar box thingys, please do share your experiences.

I'm seriously considering going for it.
Totally understandable, I would probably get the nexus 7 and wi-fish myself in your position.

If you know the area you are going and don't need to rely on it to be safe then there are little in the way of drawbacks for me.

The chartplotter world is at a cross roads I would suggest. There will likely be a major drop in sales in the low-midrange units in favour of pads. As you can see some are already catching on that they are likely no longer going to be supplying head units for much longer.

As an example, I have a Garmin 7" screen, they boast about the resolution of it. It is only 800x600! They also have the audacity to say you can't have TV playback on it....on a near 1k unit all up....unreal!!! However for every plotter sold there must be 10000 pads, completely different business model.

Cheers
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Old 30 July 2015, 07:24   #28
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Half truths and myths.......
NMEA

Wifi Speeds are Massive and can handle huge data throughput "speeds ranging from 433 megabits-per-second (Mbps), all the way through to several gigabits per second." Citation more than enough for sonar, nmea and anything else you can think of passing though it.
Much easier to fit, wont wear out and requires no cables to break etc. wouldn't surprise me that most data exchanges between devices on board are wireless within 5 years, even down to controlling anchor winches and lights.

My last reply was initially to point out that you had obviously missed what i had said earlier, and that SOME of the posts were from people who had no experience, and to clarify the pricing so it was a fair comparison,its easy to say look at at this its less when some of the important features are not there.

Then for clarity for ALL i listed the items people have been mentioning and pointed out MY experiences.

As you say either method is OK, depends on what you want.
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Old 30 July 2015, 08:03   #29
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Half truths and myths.......
NMEA

Wifi Speeds are Massive and can handle huge data throughput
Starovich,

No myths about this, simple facts.

We are not talking a lot of throuput on a boat network, it is literally a handful of kb per second in code between a plotter and GPS or the like. WiFi would actually cost more to do in most circumstances so boat builders are unlikely to do it as they have open decks at build time anyway to run cables.

When it comes to reliability you can NOT beat a cable. It is like free energy argument.

Again, doesn't mean it won't work, it just isn't better, best not confuse that.

Cheers
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Old 30 July 2015, 08:28   #30
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I guess we will have to beg to differ then, mobiles, laptops pads, all use NO cable for data, Why? Because its easier simpler.

Few years ago house builders were starting to put CAT5 network cables in homes while they were building, do they now? no, because wifi is easier.

Apart from power do you need to have any cables to a plotter?
Now wireless sonar is out Im sure the big boys will jump on the bandwagon.

Which costs less to install, a wireless system or a wired? Especially as i would put money on the fact a lot if not most of chartplotters/sounders are not installed at build but added replaced, upgraded down the line

but that's a different discussion.
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