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Old 02 July 2012, 09:20   #1
ncp
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Carling MS-Series Circuit Breakers

Has any one used these? What are the pros/cons versus the traditional fuse/circuit break & switch set up? (besides price)

For anyone that hasn't see these, they are "switch rated" circuit breakers....a switch and a circuit breaker all-in-one. Most circuit breakers are not meant to cycle though on-off; these are. Also, these are fully water proof!

Backstory:
I need to add 4 switches for some additional accessories. I currently have a 5 switch panel made by Bass Products (BASS | About Bass Products). It consists of one 40A master 12v switch/breaker and 4 switches for loads (all rated at different amps based on the accessory). My original plan was to add another column of 4 switches and next to the originals and then have a 3rd column of the push button circuit breakers to compliment the 4 new switches. Then, I found a place that sells these....If I were to buy 4 of these MS-series switches (4 @$25/ea), I wouldn't have 4 loads with separate circuit breakers and 4 without (and it will make my panel smaller). Aesthetically, the panel would be smaller, more symmetric (no single column of breakers on 1/2 of my loads). It's going to cost a little bit more but what's $60?

I tired to attach the PDF but it was too big:
http://www.relayspec.com/Company_lis.../MS-Series.pdf
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Old 02 July 2012, 10:51   #2
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NCP: Link to the pdf doesn't work.

Here's the Carling page: MS-Series | carlingtech.com

Looks like a new item; doubt you're going to find a lot of reviews. Carling is a pretty reputable company though; I wouldn't have a problem being the first to use their product.

jky
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Old 02 July 2012, 11:15   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jyasaki View Post
NCP: Link to the pdf doesn't work.

Here's the Carling page: MS-Series | carlingtech.com

Looks like a new item; doubt you're going to find a lot of reviews. Carling is a pretty reputable company though; I wouldn't have a problem being the first to use their product.

jky
Thanks for the updated link. I forgot to check it to see if it worked.

They may be new for Carling but the idea isn't new. The navy had them spec'd in the Bass panel that came in my dash. Another interesting tidbit: on my 40A main switch for the panel there were another two leads (non-switched). I had to ask Bass Products what they were for. They said that the Navy likes to put a breaker on the ground side too to isolate it, especially on aluminum hulls. I learned something new!
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Old 02 July 2012, 16:42   #4
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Ok, I ended up calling a couple of places this morning. No one has ever seen a 3A version of these (even though it is made). It seems two of the suppliers for the Navy DC panels are the only ones that actually use the on a regular basis. 2.5A or 5A was all I could get and needed to choose for my Lowrance LSS-1.

The LSS-1 specs a 3A fuse. Current draw is listed at Max: 0.75A, Typical: 0.60A, Inrush: 4.7A peak.

I chose the 2.5A (medium delay) with the thinking that if the inrush of 4.7A doesn't pop a 3A blade fuse, then it shouldn't trip this breaker. And, 2.5A is well above the "Max" and "Typical" draw requirements. Is my thinking sound????




Also, found that Airpax makes these too and the Navy doesn't mind this brand either:
http://airpax.sensata.com/pdfs/iag.pdf
See "SEALED TOGGLE CIRCUIT PROTECTORS (IAGN/IUGN)" on page 5.
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Old 03 July 2012, 11:02   #5
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I'd go 5A and use wire that will carry 5A for the power (which is just about anything.) The breaker there is to prevent the wiring from melting and catching fire, it's not to protect the [already failing] unit. You want to protect the wiring from an overcurrent condition, so the breaker should be rated at slightly higher than the max draw of the functional electronics.

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