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Old 15 December 2004, 05:50   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cookee
The above links don't work if you're not signed in as you! If you post the part numbers then everyone can go to rswww.com and look them up!
RS part No. 666-054

Des
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Old 15 December 2004, 05:55   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilge Rat
Am i being stupid here or something..............
Yes you are he is pumping the deck space not the flooding hull but I suppose given time (a lot of time) you could pump the hull dry 360 g/h x all the water in the world Des
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Old 15 December 2004, 07:23   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogue Wave
Is that silicone stuff the same as Helermans sleeving
Dunno.

I buy it as model aeroplane fuel tubing. It just pushes on and it is completely fuel tight. It's heat resistant and oil/fuel resistant. I've had stuff lying for years and it doesn't appear to deteriorate at all. It can be got in larger sizes too, commonly used as exhaust pipe. Yep, it stands that amount of heat. It's so grippy, a wee touch of grease or oil may be necessary to get it to slide along the cable. It's tough enough that you can stretch it over a connector after it has been soldered onto the cable.
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Old 15 December 2004, 08:49   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scary Des
Yes you are he is pumping the deck space not the flooding hull but I suppose given time (a lot of time) you could pump the hull dry 360 g/h x all the water in the world Des
So why not just leave the trunk at the back down, at rest the water will drain out as the decks higher than the water level, on the move it drain out through inertia ?
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Old 15 December 2004, 09:13   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilge Rat
So why not just leave the trunk at the back down, at rest the water will drain out as the decks higher than the water level, on the move it drain out through inertia ?
Aah got me there we’ll have to ask him next time he is around Des
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Old 15 December 2004, 09:15   #16
Seb
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Personally, id get myself an index marine junction box. (www.indexmarine.co.uk)

You can then simply pass the cable into the box through a water tight cable gland, make the join neatly inside with connection blocks or crimps, pass the cable out the other side through another gland and off to the power source.

Screw the box to the transom and reaffix the lid and youll never have to worry about it again!

This appears to be how the professionals do the job 'properly' and it allows for modification at a later date as you can add more glands to the box and put other connections inside.

Also allows for peace of mind as you can take the lid off easily to check connections when doing maintenance - that way youll always know its fine rather than wondering if alls ok beneath that mound of sikaflex!!

Hope it helps

Cheers
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Old 15 December 2004, 13:49   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilge Rat
So why not just leave the trunk at the back down, at rest the water will drain out as the decks higher than the water level, on the move it drain out through inertia ?
are you sure that the deck is higher than the water level outside?. i would use a trunk, but there isn't already one there, and also i dont like the idea of drilling huge holes in the transom

in conclusion i think i will probably get a waterproof connection box and cable lands to do the job properly. i also like this idea, because as said, you can check the connections now and again.

thanks for all replys, and get ready for some more newbee questions
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Old 15 December 2004, 15:23   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 118118
are you sure that the deck is higher than the water level outside?. i would use a trunk, but there isn't already one there, and also i dont like the idea of drilling huge holes in the transom

in conclusion i think i will probably get a waterproof connection box and cable lands to do the job properly. i also like this idea, because as said, you can check the connections now and again.

thanks for all replys, and get ready for some more newbee questions
This is very interesting, i'd always thought that seariders had a drain hole in the transom with an elephants trunk fitted....certainly any i've seen have....

I'd actually suggest fitting one as its the fastest way to clear a flooded deck!

anyway the idea is that if the boats correctly fitted out then the deck will sit higher than the water level, therfore if the bottom edge of the trunk is at deck level at rest water wont come into the boat, but what tends to happen is people fit the biggest meanest engine they can fit on and this makes the boat stern heavy.
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Old 15 December 2004, 16:23   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilge Rat
So why not just leave the trunk at the back down, at rest the water will drain out as the decks higher than the water level
Not on a Searider and many other boats, it won't. The deck only drains when moving forward. Venturi effect, I think.

All Seariders I've seen have been fitted with one or two trunks and these will drain the deck quicker than any bilge pump. It's a good idea to have both. If your engine's gone down, you'll need some way to empty the boat. On a 4m boat, I'd go for a manual whalegusher pump.

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