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Old 02 May 2012, 15:06   #1
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Bilge pump on transom advice please

Hi there

Any recommendations please for the best make, setup, or pitfalls for putting a bilge pump on the transom of my Bombard 5m RIB to avoid having to remove and replace the bungs to drain manually when running?

For example:
Best makes of pump?
Mounting?
Fully auto, separate float switch, or wholly manual on/off switch?

Happy for any suppliers to PM me too.

Many thanks

Steve
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Old 02 May 2012, 15:18   #2
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A 1000gph Rule pump minus the water sensing periodic spin feature
electronic float switch with manual override
mounted on the floor
smooth bore hose over the transom

Although honestly you may want to consider adding an elephant trunk instead, handles way more water than a bilge pump ever could.
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Old 03 May 2012, 04:03   #3
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..and make sure the pipe outlet doesn't dump the water straight into your elephant trunk!

I've got to second Captain Jack on the trunk. Trunks also have the advantage of not needing a working battery, switch, sensor......
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Old 03 May 2012, 04:22   #4
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Hello

Thanks for the comments.

I can quite understand the suggestions about the trunk, but - unless I'm misunderstanding what you are suggesting - I'm after a way of removing a relatively modest amount of splash over water without having to leave - or reach back from - the helm in the middle of the boat. This is especially so when planing single handed; I feel it safer to keep looking forward.

There are already two large bungs that will empty the water when at speed if removed, I'm just after avoiding turning around to fiddle with them.

The water removal is not critical as there is the manual option, so a lack of electrical power, while not great, is not really of a concern for the pump.

And for around 50, a pump system seems an affordable "luxury" :o) Or maybe people find they are more trouble than they are worth?

So any more specific suggestions on the pump type, fitting etc very welcome.

As ever many thanks for your help

Best wishes

Steve
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Old 03 May 2012, 05:07   #5
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Agreed you need trunks to remove water in a hurry when swamped.

If planing in choppy water as you say, these should be open anyway, ready for the worst.

However a float switch pump, located at the rear needs to be in a well, otherwise the boat will be full of a lot of water before it can work.

If you don't have a well, don't bother. If you do, then ideal. We have one to remove rainwater when on the mooring, plus also the water that builds as skiers get in and out.

It may as well be on a full auto. However if on a mooring/pontoon rather than trailer and you only have one battery or no isolator on two, if the float switch sticks (which they do if full of rubbish) the battery will discharge.
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Old 03 May 2012, 05:15   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Copinsay View Post
Hello

Thanks for the comments.

I can quite understand the suggestions about the trunk, but - unless I'm misunderstanding what you are suggesting - I'm after a way of removing a relatively modest amount of splash over water without having to leave - or reach back from - the helm in the middle of the boat. This is especially so when planing single handed; I feel it safer to keep looking forward.

There are already two large bungs that will empty the water when at speed if removed, I'm just after avoiding turning around to fiddle with them.

The water removal is not critical as there is the manual option, so a lack of electrical power, while not great, is not really of a concern for the pump.

And for around 50, a pump system seems an affordable "luxury" :o) Or maybe people find they are more trouble than they are worth?

So any more specific suggestions on the pump type, fitting etc very welcome.

As ever many thanks for your help

Best wishes

Steve
I also recommend a Rule 1000 manual (i.e not automatic) switched pump. I've only used the elephant trunk once, when the boat was flooded in a viscious overfall. Mine was fitted from new with a couple of self tappers. I've since added another similar pump and separate float switch to clear rain water when the boat is on a mooring. I stuck that on with Sikaflex. No problems with it coming unstuck after two seasons and better than putting screws in.
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Old 03 May 2012, 05:35   #7
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I fitted a rule one to my SR4 for the same reason as you, just wanted to get rid of water from the deck that collects with people getting in & out + if it rains, I have not had to use the trunk on any of my ribs yet in 10 + years of ribbing! (Must try harder!)
Also doing a lot in harbour with a mile or so to get out the trunk is not much use getting rid of water at 6 to 8 knots.
I do not have a well but have put the pump in the corner & all the water runes to the back anyway & you can soon lean over to one side to get the water running in to it.
I have just sikaflex it to the floor & have a on of stitch, works for me & I did the same to my Osprey Viper too!
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Old 03 May 2012, 07:19   #8
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make sure if u mount one in the transom sump that the float switch is not in one of the corners ,it will register water when there is nothing to pump if it's not dead level on the trailer or ground.
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Old 03 May 2012, 08:50   #9
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Quote:
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I have not had to use the trunk on any of my ribs yet in 10 + years of ribbing!
You're not doing it right......

Quote:
Originally Posted by Copinsay View Post
I'm after a way of removing a relatively modest amount of splash over water without having to leave - or reach back from - the helm in the middle of the boat. This is especially so when planing single handed; I feel it safer to keep looking forward.
I have twin trunks - both workable without taking the other hand off the wheel. Instead of the silly wee bit of string and a jam cleat on the transom, replace the stupid wee bit of string with a decent length of 6mm braid, lead it forward (granted I have the advantage of 6 handholds that I can "duct" it through) then use a simple stainless hook & a suitably positioned loop. Unhook - trunks down. Grab hook, pull & hook to loop - trunks up.

I had to put a bit of bungee to yank the rope back through the handholds and make sure the trunks go down when required, but it's not difficult to remote operate them.


On a similar theme I have an emergency release line on my tow bridle. That line is grabbable all the way down the hull.
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Old 03 May 2012, 09:14   #10
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extra long shaft o/b and a bilge pump, and we no longer have to use the elephant trunk - a flick of the switch and its gone....however the trunk is there in case of a swamping and the need to remove a lotta water in a short time but thats only gonna work if we can get forward speed. Dead in the water the trunk is just gonna let water in and you need to close it and use a pump, even if the most efficient form of bilge pump is indeed a bucket in the hands of a very frightened man
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