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Old 07 January 2003, 12:37   #21
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Quote:
Originally posted by crazyhorse
......as Im told that the mca have the list of approved vhf sets.

Is there a possibility to obtain this list and publish it in the Forum??
Not that I do not think that other USA made VHFs don't work in Europe (think about US vessels/crafts coming into Europe. They all have USA made marine equipmet onboard and not EU made and all work PERRFECTLY!!) but it will be usefull to know.
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Old 07 January 2003, 15:25   #22
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I have asked the MCA for the imfo will let you know when it arrives.I also have asked the MCA on the implications of CE catergories for Ribs and the implications for us,when that comes in wrighting I will update the appropriate thread .

Its a lark.

Crazyhorse
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Old 07 January 2003, 16:04   #23
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Crazyhorse

FIRST CLASS MATE will be waiting to see what will transpire and I'm sure that it will be VERY INTERESTING for some LOLOL
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Old 07 January 2003, 16:09   #24
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any

electrical experts know what I should look for when purchasing this illusive arial for my VHF which fell off the back of dell boys three wheeler, which probably wont work anyway judging by the above threads !!

What type, assuming it will be mounted on my stainless arch ?

What's the frequency stuff mean they always quote, etc ?

Why cant I go to a radio ham shop explain what I want, which is basicly a wiggly metal thing and a tv arial lead and buy the bits to put one together ? Is this pos ?
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Old 07 January 2003, 16:15   #25
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Matiboy

Without being an expert on electronics I think that if you take the VHF or write its type, frequency and other data is got on it they will give an aerial (but better take the unit with you). However, with all VFHs there is also a min length of wire required between the VHF and the aerial (I think). So do you have the manual??
Just wait a few mins to see what someone else says just in case I'm wrong. Electronics is not my thing but always keen to assit LOLOL
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Old 07 January 2003, 16:22   #26
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Mateboy

I truley hope your set gives you constant pleasure.A vhf ariel for marine use that is the right length and designed for the jobee will cost about 25/30 quid.Any chandler will supply you.

The main thing is please make sure you use plenty of sealent or if possible mount it in a place that will not get to wet.Take a handheld with you and a emergencie ariel if possible.

Sorry to be a bit of a kill joy.

But its one of the most important pieces of kit in my humble opinion, and I have lost all coms before at a critical time 3am off a lee shore, and if it wasnt for my back up hand held could of been in the mire.

All the best Crazyhorse
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Old 07 January 2003, 16:27   #27
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The standard marine vhf frequencie for channel 0 is 156.00 the standard marine vhf ariel is designed for around this band width.

Please dont try and get a coathanger and use this as well.?
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Old 07 January 2003, 17:02   #28
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Crazyhorse

the fibreglass arials can be purchased for about 25 + quid as you say, but for mounting on an A frame I have been advised to purchase the flexible wire ones which seem double the price

Any thoughts as to which type is preferable ?

The ability to unscrew the arial for clearance seems to me to be the deciding factor

PS will a plastic coat hanger work !!! Couldnt find a wire one in the cupboard

Cheers
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Old 07 January 2003, 19:17   #29
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Guys... my 10p's worth...

Electricaly a marine VHF aeriel is a marine VHF aeriel - designed for and tuned @ factory for the appropiate frequency(s) which will work internationaly. A ham radio supplier / CB shop etc. etc. will be able to get / make / supply one but best to get one from a chandlers, complete with the correct connector - either already fitted or kit of parts for home assembly.

Any aeriel will be tuned / designed for 'centre band' and everything either side of this is a comprimise, Marine VHF is approx. 155 > 159 MHz, so the aeriel will be designed with about 157MHz as it's optimum frequency, but the ineffeciency 2MHz either side is very small.

The length of coax is not critical - the whole idea of coax is that electricaly it is 'invisable' to the radio, which is why you can't use TV coax to extend a VHF etc. etc.

The connector on fixed VHF's is (always in my experience, but could be others) a PL 259, this can be adapted to a BNC as usually found on a handheld VHF if required - i always carry an adapter 'coz using the handheld on the big aeriel could be useful some day!

Er... thats about all on the technical side - hope it helps rather than confuses!

Further to someones comment about fibreglass type whip aeriels i have two of these on the A-Frame (circa 25) for over a year with no problems, plenty of rough-sea use. I've seen the smaller flexiable (called a RIB raider i think) - about 50-60, but it would want to be right on top of the A-frame since it is considerably shorter than the conventional white marine VHF aerials you see.

Regards

Daniel

UPDATED: Thought i should add that operating a radio transmitter without an aeriel is very likely to damage it (blow-up RF output amplifier).

Having re-read what i wrote, the frequencies i have mentioned (155-159) could be fractionaly inaccurate, i think marine VHF receive on the duplex channels is higher (165MHz ish) but the examples serve to illustarte my point about frequency comprimise!
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Old 08 January 2003, 04:15   #30
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Dosn't the "Licence" just apply to the vessel, allowing a radio to be used on-board. I don't think the RA require any details about your radio.

However it is illegal to "Take into service" a radio that does not meet the specs.

I have some info on DSC radios at

http://www.ribpanther.co.uk/faq.html

The info below was found on the RA site at

www.radio.gov.uk


Maritime radio equipment falls under either the EU Radio Equipment and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment (R&TTE) Directive 99/5/EC, the UK Radio Interface Requirements or the Merchant Shipping (Marine Equipment) Regulations 1999.

In order to avoid causing harmful interference to other authorised users, it is important that all radio equipment operates in accordance with the relevant technical parameters. In addition, in the case of equipment used in a maritime environment, radio equipment needs to be able to operate satisfactorily under the conditions likely to be encountered on board a ship at sea and to be compatible with other radio systems used on board the vessel.

Under the Radio Equipment and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment Regulations 2000, which implements the R&TTE Directive in the UK, it is a legal requirement that all radio equipment (with certain specific exceptions) meets certain essential requirements. It is the responsibility of any person who places radio equipment on the market or takes it into service to ensure that the requirements of the R&TTE Directive are met. It must be marked with the CE marking which means that a written declaration of conformity by the manufacturer has been drawn up for it, together with information for the user on the intended use of the equipment (e.g. Maritime radio).

The R&TTE Directive replaced the type approval regime and came into force on 8 April 2000; prior to this time it was still a legal requirement for Maritime radio equipment to be type approved under section 84 of the Telecommunications Act 1984. The R&TTE Directive also has a one-year transition period, during which equipment already covered by a type approval certificate may continue to be placed on the market and taken into service. No new type approvals have been issued since 7 April 2000. After 7 April 2001 only equipment that complies with the R&TTE Directive may be placed on the market, though equipment already type approved may continue to be taken into service. Moreover, such type approved equipment already taken into service would satisfy the terms of the licence.

In addition, it is the licensee's responsibility to ensure that all Maritime radio equipment to be covered by a licence granted by the Agency meets the relevant UK Radio Interface Requirement. UK Radio Interface Requirements provide a high level description of spectrum use (frequency range, channel spacing, output power, technology to be used where appropriate), licensing regime, etc. Details of the relevant UK Radio Interface Requirements can be obtained from the Radiocommunications Agency, telephone 020 7211 0211.

One of the exceptions mentioned above is that of Maritime radio equipment within the scope of the Directive 96/98/EC (the 'Marine Equipment Directive'). This is implemented by the Merchant Shipping (Marine Equipment) Regulations 1999. This equipment is not within the scope of the R&TTE Directive but must meet the requirements of the Marine Equipment Directive 96/98/EC. This equipment will bear the "ship's wheel" marking rather than the CE marking.
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