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Old 18 August 2007, 11:52   #11
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What do you mean by TVO?

it's a hand cranked model (which is why it's an arse to start!) like the picture in your link. It'll literally run at 100 RPM a minute - at those sort of revs you can only hear the air being sucked in and the prop shaft turning - which is why it's great for bass fishing. No sound!

Sorry for high-jacking your thread RBW
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Old 18 August 2007, 12:03   #12
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TVO = Tractor Vapourising Oil. (basically like paraffin).

In the days of yore (when I was a mere lad) my Dads first few tractors were TVO based. You started them on petrol and let them warm up - then when they were warm you switched to TVO and although you lost a few horsepower, the paraffin was a lot cheaper to buy so it made economic sense.

All Dads tractors that were like this were based on the Ferguson T20 as per wikipedia.
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Old 18 August 2007, 12:06   #13
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TVO is tractor vapourising oil - basically paraffin and petrol with 2 stroke oil - used to be used on old tractors etc when diesel wasn't so common. It did say that some of the old Brit engines were TVO which is why I asked.
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Old 18 August 2007, 12:22   #14
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When I was a kid my father had a friend that owned an old converted fishing boat, about 45 ft. I think it was one of the Little Ships of Dunkirk. You lifted a hatch in the deck, exposing a large flywheel, made sure the de-comp. lever was open and spun the flywheel with your foot, when it was up to speed close the de-comp. and Da-Donk, Da-Donk, Da Donk.................. he used to boast he could cross the Channel on less than 2 gallons of deisel.
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Old 18 August 2007, 12:23   #15
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Thanks for all the replies.

So the real old "putt putts" last forever. They also sound great! How about the turbo charged modern marine diesels, like the Volvo KAD44?
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Old 18 August 2007, 13:22   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rbw156 View Post
Thanks for all the replies.

So the real old "putt putts" last forever. They also sound great! How about the turbo charged modern marine diesels, like the Volvo KAD44?
I've a little experience with this engine, coupled with these observations from knowledgeable marine engineers (I pump them for info when ever poss )

1) In leisure applications, they die form lack use or lack of maintenance, things that will shorten it's life are;
Turning the key once every two weeks during the winter, bad thing to do if your only keeping it running for a short period of time as all you do is introduce moisture to the wrong bits
2) Always walk the boat up onto the plane, with the throttles as the s/c can shove oil out of the journals at low RPM creating wear.
3) Don’t leave anti freeze more than two years as it become corrosive after that time.
4) Do the entire usual servicing etc regularly.

If you do the above, estimates (no one knows for certain, as far as I'm aware could be wrong) if used every day, oil changed regularly, fishermen suggest ten's of thousands of hours .
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Old 18 August 2007, 13:28   #17
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I've a little experience with this engine, coupled with these observations from knowledgeable marine engineers (I pump them for info when ever poss )

1) In leisure applications, they die form lack use or lack of maintenance, things that will shorten it's life are;
Turning the key once every two weeks during the winter, bad thing to do if your only keeping it running for a short period of time as all you do is introduce moisture to the wrong bits
2) Always walk the boat up onto the plane, with the throttles as the s/c can shove oil out of the journals at low RPM creating wear.
3) Donít leave anti freeze more than two years as it become corrosive after that time.
4) Do the entire usual servicing etc regularly.

If you do the above, estimates (no one knows for certain, as far as I'm aware could be wrong) if used every day, oil changed regularly, fishermen suggest ten's of thousands of hours .
IBWET, thanks for your advice. How should I maintain the engine over the winter period if I only use it occasionally, but for reasonable periods when I do? Also, what does "s/c" mean in your second point?
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Old 18 August 2007, 18:39   #18
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Originally Posted by rbw156 View Post
IBWET, thanks for your advice. How should I maintain the engine over the winter period if I only use it occasionally, but for reasonable periods when I do? Also, what does "s/c" mean in your second point?
Take the boat for a run,don't just start the engine and leave it for a couple of min ticking over.

S/C - supercharger.

Reading my last post,walking the boat up onto the plane may not be so important for a light rib. This was more for a cruiser weighing 10 tons,which takes it's time getting out of the hole.

watch for black dust;it means a belts on the way out. is your engine EDC ?

remember the air filter if you don't change it, power drops off. Maintenance, It's pretty typical of a car if have done that before.

PM me if you have any issue's I'm no expert but might have come across it.
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Old 18 August 2007, 18:42   #19
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i used to run commercial boats which would average 4 to 5 thousand hours a year, a real bitch when servicing as the engines never cooled down. i had one boat with a perkins m240 ti, 6,354 that must of had around 70,000 hours on it and still ran perfect till the heat ex/ ex manifold cracked and there was not a replacement available. as far as i know it was on its original liners but second set of pistons and bearings,
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Old 18 August 2007, 19:28   #20
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My 1st engine was a KAD 44 EDC

Put 4500 hours on it, after servicing early, and looking after it all its life from new.
Took it for an overhaul, and the price i was given by volvo to do 'all it needed' was about 2 k less than a whole new engine, so i put a new engine in it instead.
Took the issue up with volvo, who then said it was my fault, for using it so much, and not using a main dealer for all its servicing...... argued a bit with them, but got nowhere. think if i remem properly they said that on average a leisure user would clock up about 100 hours per year - so that made my engine 45 years old. At that time, which was 2003, they had not heard of a KAD 44 with so many hours on it.. Oh, and i was told i had also been running it at the wrong revs, so that was my fault as well.

Pete
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