Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 22 October 2013, 07:54   #11
RIBnet admin team
 
willk's Avatar
 
Country: Ireland
Make: Redbay Boats
Length: 9m +
Engine: 370hp
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 12,924
RIBase
If there is dried salt in the tray, it will attract water from the air and reform droplets that don't dry in damp conditions. I've seen this on all sorts of kit.
__________________

__________________
"Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?"
.
willk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 October 2013, 12:36   #12
Member
 
Dan Gurney's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Bingley, West Yorks
Boat name: Iolar
Make: Redbay
Length: 6m +
Engine: Suzuki DF140
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 841
So considering a cannot brim the tank to the point where the top is completely covered. .. what's the next best option?
__________________

__________________
Dan Gurney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 October 2013, 12:53   #13
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Southampton
Boat name: SMH Rib / War Shot
Make: Ribtec / Scorpion
Length: 4m +
Engine: 10hp Yam / 150hp opt
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 1,894
RIBase
90 litre stainless tank in the 5.4 Searider - never any problems, and also had filler direct in the tank. Always used to fill it as best as I could.

160 litre GRP tank in the Scorpion. never had any problems in 8 years of ownership. Some winters the tank has been full, others not.

25 litre tanks in the 4m searider that stays afloat over the winter - have had some water in the tanks - but it might be dripping onto the filler cap and into the tank through the breather, which I should close, but always forget to!
__________________
Searider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 October 2013, 12:55   #14
RIBnet supporter
 
Aries's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: South Coast
Boat name: PLAYER 1
Make: Zodiac
Length: 7m +
Engine: OB/P/250
MMSI: 235090989
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 207
RIBase
Is there not a problem with ethanol added to petrol degrading much quicker than "old school petrol" and so its better to drain as much as possible and start with fresh next season?
__________________
Aries is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 October 2013, 12:57   #15
AJ.
RIBnet supporter
 
AJ.'s Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Warwickshire
Boat name: Impulse
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki 140
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,020
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clamchowder View Post
So considering a cannot brim the tank to the point where the top is completely covered. .. what's the next best option?
You probably don't want to brim it as I discovered with temperature changes fuel expands and contracts. So although it is doubtful as we are moving into colder temperatures if we got a freaky warmer spell it may overflow
__________________
AJ. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 October 2013, 13:03   #16
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Seattle
Boat name: Water Dog
Make: Polaris
Length: 4m +
Engine: Yamaha 60hp
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 1,152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aries View Post
Is there not a problem with ethanol added to petrol degrading much quicker than "old school petrol" and so its better to drain as much as possible and start with fresh next season?
I use E10 year round and never had an issue. As is it keeps for at least 6 months, but probably longer. If keeping longer than a few months I normally use stabilizer which isn't very expensive and gives some peace of mind that it'll start fast whenever I use it next.
__________________
captnjack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 October 2013, 14:21   #17
RIBnet supporter
 
Pikey Dave's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: South Yorks
Boat name: Black Pig
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: DF140a
MMSI: 235111389
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 7,582
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clamchowder View Post
So considering a cannot brim the tank to the point where the top is completely covered. .. what's the next best option?
If you can fill it as far as possible, you are still reducing the surface area available for condensation to form, which will be a darn sight less than if it was empty. Make sure you have a good water separating filter in your fuel line (you should have this anyway) & keep an eye on the filter for the first run out next year.
__________________
Rule#2: Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level & then beat you with experience.
Rule#3: Tha' can't educate pork.
Rule#4: See rule#5
Pikey Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 October 2013, 11:15   #18
Member
 
Country: Finland
Town: Helsinki
Boat name: SR 5.4
Make: Avon
Length: 4m +
Engine: Toh1 3,5 Yam 90/2S
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 896
Condensation is a interesting subject. If the space is airtight/closed, only a negligible amount of condensation can occur in a normal size fuel tank (Air can hold only a few gram water/100 L air in 20C temp). But if there is change of air like through a breather line/hole, the process is ongoing and quantity can accumulate over time.

If unsure, better to fill up, I usually do also on gas tight portable tanks, even if really does not matter much.
__________________
fun on a boat is inversely proportional to size...sort of anyway
C-NUMB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25 October 2013, 14:09   #19
nik
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: east cowes
Make: academic
Length: no boat
Engine: fresh air
MMSI: N/A
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 540
I had a diesel rib for 6 years.
200 litre stainless tank.
Never used any diesel treatment, never had a problem.
__________________
nik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25 October 2013, 21:10   #20
Member
 
Country: Other
Make: Ribtec
Length: 7m +
Engine: Yamaha F225
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 411
To all the "never had a problem" people (and there are obviously many) can I ask how many times you ran your tank dry ?

As I see it, you could be building up a potential problem without realising it. If there is any water, it will sit in the bottom of the tank and only present itself when you are draining the dregs of the tank.

I installed twin tanks on my boat, thinking that if there was ever an issue with dirty fuel, I would switch the supply over to the other tank. This was not a smart move as I'd normally fill both tanks from the same source anyway and once you get dirty fuel at the motor, you're stuffed.

I did have a problem coming back across the channel and embarrassingly conked out on the ferry route between Ryde and Pompey (Thank you for coming to our aid Gaffirs, Rogue & Pete7) When the boat was recovered, Mark Bleeker told me that he removed litres (!) of water from the tanks. I put this down to the fuel that I had picked up from St Vaast for the return journey, thinking that it must have been sat there in tanks on the water all over the winter, as this was early May time.

Whilst this is a probable cause, it is also possible that this was a condensation problem that had accumulated over a period of time within my own boat. I think probably not due to the amount of water that Mark said he extracted, but certainly food for thought.

I now have two water separators in series in my fuel line to try to prevent a recurrence of this situation and try not to let the tanks get low.
__________________

__________________
Bittentobuggery is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 22:49.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.