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Old 05 August 2008, 11:04   #1
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Sea Spray on the engine block.

I am just wondering is is normal for some sea spray to be on the engine block i.e. under the cover. The engine is a Etec 60 on a Valiant Dr 490. Or is this an indication that the engine may be too low?

TSM
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Old 05 August 2008, 11:29   #2
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Wd 40

Is it ok to spray WD 40 on the engine to protect from rust
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Old 05 August 2008, 13:02   #3
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I am just wondering is is normal for some sea spray to be on the engine block i.e. under the cover. The engine is a Etec 60 on a Valiant Dr 490. Or is this an indication that the engine may be too low?

TSM
Was worrying about the same sea spraying issue, seems normal to happen in these 2 points: On top of the carb air muffler, water coming in throught the manual rope start rubber assy that comes in contact with cowl on portable engines and throught the rear engine cowl vent to engine block, spark plugs area, etc. Would be adviseable to remove the engine cowl alter each use, wet a cloth on fresh water, drain excesive liquid and wipe off all sea water sprays found, dry well, and spray on round painter brush top small amounts of WD-40 to protectant/paint whatever parts you need to protect. One of the parts that rusts more are spark plugs seats, so WD-40 more frecuent.

The issue of using a brush is that WD-40 cans sprays too much liquid out, this is to avoid a WD-40 mess inside cowl, will also save you buying another can more frequent than spraying directly, apply as required.

Happy Ribbing
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Old 05 August 2008, 13:17   #4
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Would be adviseable to remove the engine cowl alter each use, wet a cloth on fresh water and wipe off all sea water sprays, dry well, and spray on round painter brush top small amounts of W-40 to protectant/paint whatever parts you need to protect. One of the parts that rusts more are spark plugs seats, so WD-40 more frecuent.

The issue of using a brush is that the WD-40 can sprays too much liquid out, so to avoid a WD-40 mess inside, will also save you buying another can more frequent than spraying directly, apply as required.

Happy Ribbing
Those of us with a life tend to just liberally spray WD40 or similar all over the motor.

It probably isn't "sea spray" that's causing the problem though, it's just the result of using the motor in a salt laden air enviroment.
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Old 05 August 2008, 13:27   #5
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Those of us with a life tend to just liberally spray WD40 or similar all over the motor.

It probably isn't "sea spray" that's causing the problem though, it's just the result of using the motor in a salt laden air enviroment.
Have not used a boat/engine on sweet waters environments to see if this problem matches, but would be inclined for any engine doing the same, but with sweet water sprays instead. Anyway protect as required and don't spray WD-40 so liberally as Dirk wisely advises.

Happy Sibbing/Ribbing
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Old 05 August 2008, 13:32   #6
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Ever wondered what the "WD" stands for?
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Old 05 August 2008, 13:50   #7
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Ever wondered what the "WD" stands for?
WD stands for: Water Displacement, a 1953 tech formula developed by Norm Larssen, when working for the Rocket Chemical Company, renamed after some years as the SW-40 Company, to protect the Atlas missile from rust & corrosion, and latter found to have astonishing 2 thousand different uses including outboards.

Has any one out there tried WD-40 on PVC or Hypalon tubes to remove hard to wipe grease stains , discoloring bathing suits ink stains when sitting on tubes, etc ? Was the stain efficiently removed ?
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Old 05 August 2008, 14:06   #8
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WD stands for: Water Displacement, a 1953 tech formula developed by Norm Larssen, when working for the Rocket Chemical Company, renamed after some years as the SW-40 Company, to protect the Atlas missile from rust & corrosion, and latter found to have astonishing 2 thousand different uses including outboards.
Google is my friend!

10 years or so ago, I was at a presentation where a representative from WD40 told us how the company used to run a photo competition for the strangest use of the product, such as being used for shaving on an artic expedition, they closed the competition after they started to receive several "adult" photo's showing WD40's use as a lubricant!
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Old 05 August 2008, 14:43   #9
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Google is my friend!

10 years or so ago, I was at a presentation where a representative from WD40 told us how the company used to run a photo competition for the strangest use of the product, such as being used for shaving on an artic expedition, they closed the competition after they started to receive several "adult" photo's showing WD40's use as a lubricant!
Yeap right Dirk, Google is our belowed friend. Nice advise on the adult use, will remenber when out of lubricant as always have cans of WD-40 handy. "Thumbs Up"

Happy Ribbing
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Old 05 August 2008, 14:52   #10
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Nice advise on the adult use, will remenber when out of lubricant as always have cans of WD-40 handy. "Thumbs Up"
I wouldnt .. try setting fire to the stuff.. then imagine what it would do to your bell end

Mind you .. each to their own
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