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Old 04 July 2004, 12:17   #1
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Rusty bolts!!

Was going to do a little mod to the steering, but when I took a little closer look found that some crittical nuts/studs where well rusted, I say crittical because if I break one off I'll have to stip a large proportion of the engine to gain access to the steering arm, either to replace or repair it.

Question: Anyone got some good tips for cracking nuts/bolts without snapping them.

PS they are in an awkward position, so pouring coke on isn't an option.

Andy
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Old 04 July 2004, 12:51   #2
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A well fitting spanner preferaably the right size and a generous helping of heat will sort that one out. Anything on a boat looks worse than it actualy is.Alan P
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Old 04 July 2004, 15:05   #3
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A tight fitting ring spanner or socket would be best. Open ended spanners are more likely to slip and round the nut off. Heat and a sharp hit on the arm of the spanner should help.
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Old 04 July 2004, 16:30   #4
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The only way quik fit could get my exhaust off last time was with a blowtorch, and your bolt looks similar, so same advice as above!

Ricky (slightly pissed after the post wimbledon party!)
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Old 04 July 2004, 17:09   #5
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Not a whole lot of hexagon left I'm afraid and am pretty sure that any spanner used will just make things worse, to make it even more difficult I can't even get a mole grip or small pipe wrench on because of the restricted space. Keep the Idea's comming though!
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Old 04 July 2004, 17:26   #6
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Don't know if you can reach in this case, but when faced with rounded off nuts or bolt heads, one of my favorite tricks is to carefully weld a much larger nut over the old one, or weld a new bolt to the head of the old one. Expect lots of spitting back on rusty items.

This serves two purposes, firstly the application of heat may release the nut/bolt, and secondly you end up with fresh surfaces with more leverage.

Works even better if you can flash cool the hot nut with water as the shock sometimes frees it off.

Obviously this is not possible where heat will damage surrounding areas, and of course no where near the fuel line please.

Its worked for me many times, but I'm lucky to have my own welding gear.

Good luck

Nasher.
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Old 04 July 2004, 18:05   #7
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Er, may I suggest an angle grinder. Grind away two sides of the nut and the bits left will just tap off. You could also grind away the ends of the studs because you only need a nut length of thread when you replace them.
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Old 05 July 2004, 01:26   #8
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Snap On make a tool called a torque socket (clever little gadget, it is like an external stud extractor). It fits on the end of a standard socket set so access should be no problem - but they are expensive - do you have any good friends who are mechanics?
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Old 05 July 2004, 02:45   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten
Snap On make a tool called a torque socket (clever little gadget, it is like an external stud extractor). It fits on the end of a standard socket set so access should be no problem - but they are expensive - do you have any good friends who are mechanics?
Following on from what Kittens suggested... i bought a socket attachment in Halfords called a "Gattor grip" its a large socket that fits a normal socket drive but instead of the hex shaped inside it has small pins that retract up when fitted over the damaged nut head, this means it fits exactly to the shape of the nut head or in your case badly corroded nut head......and this thing does actually work, i removed corroded bolts from an engine heat shield of a car with this and to my amazement the gattor gripped them perfectly and didn't snapp the heads of the bolts.
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Old 05 July 2004, 03:04   #10
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May I (respectfully) suggest that you don't use naked flame or grinding sparks around your boat/engine unless absolutely necessary ? The photo seems to show a nut, so try a tool for the job called, funnily enough, a nut splitter. Low tech, but very effective and will not damage the stud/bolt thread. You can buy them from any good tool factors (and Halfords I think- from their SykesPickevant range). Good to keep in the tool box.

Good luck, Jono
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