Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 06 November 2015, 06:05   #1
Member
 
Stigomery's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Cambridge
Boat name: SIBylle
Make: Honda Honwave
Length: 3m +
Engine: Honda BF20
MMSI: 235915576
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 407
Running in a new motor

Hi,

I'm keen to understand the mechanics of running in a new motor. I understand from Honda that the first 15 minutes should be idle, then 45 minutes no more than 2-3k rpm, then 60 minutes no more than 4-5k rpm, then 8 hours of no more than 5 minutes constant at full whack...

So my question is this, I'm guessing those first 2 hours are crucial and therefore do they need to be done as one outing, i.e. is it best to run the engine continuously for those first 2 hours or is it acceptable to potter somewhere at idle/low revs, stop, then restart and do the next 30 minutes elsewhere. Then do the next hour another time... etc.?

Thanks,

Stig
__________________

__________________
Stigomery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 November 2015, 06:26   #2
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Retford
Boat name: Spy-sea-one
Make: Mercury
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki Outboard/25/4
MMSI: 235074042
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 3,573
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stigomery View Post
Hi,

I'm keen to understand the mechanics of running in a new motor. I understand from Honda that the first 15 minutes should be idle, then 45 minutes no more than 2-3k rpm, then 60 minutes no more than 4-5k rpm, then 8 hours of no more than 5 minutes constant at full whack...

So my question is this, I'm guessing those first 2 hours are crucial and therefore do they need to be done as one outing, i.e. is it best to run the engine continuously for those first 2 hours or is it acceptable to potter somewhere at idle/low revs, stop, then restart and do the next 30 minutes elsewhere. Then do the next hour another time... etc.?

Thanks,

Stig
when you get your new engine its fully explained in the manual i am running in at the moment with my Suzuki do it to the book as they can tell what its been running at with a PC hooked to it if you have any warranty issues. running at lower RPM is OK, the run in period is while the engine beds in ie; piston rings with the cylinders etc too much heat can be generated if at full whack causing the engine to seize during this time. variation in RPM is needed that's why it goes up in RPM mine finishes at 10 hours i am on 4 hours now and with my set up 1/4 throttle is plenty.
__________________

__________________
jeffstevens763@g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 November 2015, 07:07   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: East Anglia
Boat name: Nimrod II
Make: Aerotec 380
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki DF20 EFI
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,278
You are right Stig, that first two hours is far better done in one if nothing else to know that more restricted running is compleed in favourable circumstances. With 20hp on a SIB the final 8hrs will be easy as it will push you along nicely without huge effort on the part of the motor.

As Jeff says varying revs is the key.
__________________
Fenlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 November 2015, 08:08   #4
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: bicester
Length: no boat
Engine: outboard only
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 894
If you are running it in any container, you must keep the water cold.If the water starts to get warm shut the OBM down .
__________________
uncle al is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 November 2015, 08:36   #5
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Retford
Boat name: Spy-sea-one
Make: Mercury
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki Outboard/25/4
MMSI: 235074042
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 3,573
my engine is Suzuki 25
break in time 10 hrs
tick over 5 mins from cold always.
run in gear at tick over 15 mins
next 1 hr 45 mins less than 1/2 throttle.
next 1 hr at 3/4 throttle
next 7 hrs at desired speed but not at full throttle for more than 5 mins at any time
__________________
jeffstevens763@g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07 November 2015, 19:21   #6
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Leicester
Length: 5m +
Engine: 135hp Mercury
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 708
Discussed at some length here: Running in a new outboard
__________________
paintman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 November 2015, 06:16   #7
RIBnet supporter
 
Pikey Dave's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: South Yorks
Boat name: Black Pig
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: DF140a
MMSI: 235111389
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 7,596
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stigomery View Post
Hi,

I'm keen to understand the mechanics of running in a new motor. I understand from Honda that the first 15 minutes should be idle, then 45 minutes no more than 2-3k rpm, then 60 minutes no more than 4-5k rpm, then 8 hours of no more than 5 minutes constant at full whack...

So my question is this, I'm guessing those first 2 hours are crucial and therefore do they need to be done as one outing, i.e. is it best to run the engine continuously for those first 2 hours or is it acceptable to potter somewhere at idle/low revs, stop, then restart and do the next 30 minutes elsewhere. Then do the next hour another time... etc.?

Thanks,

Stig
Most engine wear occurs at starting & warm up. If you repeatedly start the engine & allow it to cool you won't do it any good, especially at break in. Even a run in engine should be allowed to warm up before giving it "the beans"
__________________
Rule#2: Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level & then beat you with experience.
Rule#3: Tha' can't educate pork.
Rule#4: See rule#5
Pikey Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 21:42.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.