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Old 29 April 2004, 06:03   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Halliday
The engine produces a progressive increase in force as you accelerate, which becomes a constant when you reach max speed for throttle setting.
Only if you're in a flat calm! You don't even need to be "flying" the boat to get massive changes in the load.

John
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Old 29 April 2004, 06:23   #32
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Cookee
I have just re-read the thread and we seem to have gone a bit off topic.
The forces imposed when racing are going to be a lot more extreme than us mere mortals are likely to experience. Part of the original question was “up or down when towing”. It then went on to “what is the tilt stop for?”
I think the up and down thing is down to personal choice and circumstances. In my case the engine manual says nothing about towing! Just leaving the engine up afloat. The tilt lock is only mentioned in relation to withdrawing the trim rods. I like the more balanced up position. Engine down most defiantly grounds the skeg on bumps, and the trailer balance is set up for engine up. It makes a hell of a difference to the nose weight.
Smaller outboards without PTT seem to have lightly constructed tilt locks, which could disengage over bumps. Red Fox’s manual implies this.
Hydraulic PTT should hold the engine anywhere, that is what hydraulics do. The lock in this case, I should imagine, is a safety device in case of hydraulic failure.
I seem to have got a green button, and do not want to do a Manos, so shall we agree to be confused together?
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Old 29 April 2004, 06:28   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Halliday
I seem to have got a green button, and do not want to do a Manos, so shall we agree to be confused together?
Sounds good to me!
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Originally Posted by Zippy
When a boat looks that good who needs tubes!!!
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Old 29 April 2004, 06:31   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Kennett
Only if you're in a flat calm! You don't even need to be "flying" the boat to get massive changes in the load.

John

What I have failed to say is that when afloat the forces tend to be in a fore and aft direction, drag - flying, less drag - land - sudden drag with more power 'cos the revs went up when airborne. When towing the are more up and down.

I seem to be in a hole. I shall stop digging!!!!!!!!
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