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Old 09 January 2013, 16:39   #11
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Appropriate markings on container:

Quote:
1. The plastic container shall bear legible, indelible and durable marking or labelling showing the following—

(a)the manufacturer's name;
(b)the month and year of manufacture;
(c)the nominal capacity of the container in litres and half litres rounded down to the nearest half litre below;
(d)the words and figures “Complies with S.I. 1982/630”;
(e)the words “PETROL” and “HIGHLY FLAMMABLE”;
(f)an appropriate hazard warning sign; and
(g)an appropriate phrase or phrases in English indicating the precautions to be taken.
2. The words and sign on the container in accordance with paragraph 1(e), (f) and (g) of this Schedule shall be capable of being easily seen and read when the container is placed in an attitude in which it may normally be expected to be placed and shall stand out from their background so as to be readily noticeable.

3. Any label shall be securely fixed to the container with its entire surface adhering to it.
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Old 09 January 2013, 17:12   #12
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Originally Posted by IanH
I've been talking to our Petroleum Licensing Officer at my Petroleum Licensing Authority (PLA) and the laws are all a rather confusing and outdated. Its going to be reviewed soon triggered by the episode of the MP who told people to stock up on fuel in their jerry cans during a fuel strike. One can hope that the review will simplify things and bring the rules up to date.

Basically there is no straight answer as its all down to whether the storage container/fuel tank is approved for its use. However, storage of more than 30 litres near a building appears to be a nono unless you talk to the PLA and I still think that that 30l needs to be split across at least 4 containers containing a max of approx 10l (tanks often hold a different amount than marked as a vapour gap). Transportation of reasonable (read 'much more than you would ever need to personally transport') quantities of fuel is allowed but again, as long as the container is approved for transportation. In otherwords, you can fill up an approved container and drive it to your boat even if the quantity was more than you could legally store.

His suggestion was to check with the petrol station that they consider the tank as an approved container before filling up. By the letter of the law, as long as it was an approved demountable fuel tank for a boat it is allowed (covered under the "demountable fuel tank of a motor boat or similar vessel" bit) but there will always be some guy who interprets green as red and refuse you.

Approval seems to consist of whether the unit was designed, manufactured, built and appropriately marked for its anticipated use. Suitable does not mean approved. The marking seemed to be very important to him - it is meant to clearly indicate to anyone that the container contains a flammable substance so a dark green unmarked jerry can is unlikely to fit the bill but a red can with flammable liquid printed on it could be. As my outboard is brand new from a reputable manufacturer bought from a reputable source he didn't think it would be an issue but still asked me to confirm this with the manufacturer. He wasn't however so positive about a container of unknown origin or bought from a back street trader.

If you have a boat fuel tank that is approved for storage of fuel then it can be used to store fuel. But if its not approved for storing fuel, the moment it is removed from the boat it becomes storage and is thus governed by the storage regulations. I guess that there are probably very few boat fuel tanks that would not be approved for storage but I guess something like the flexible (RNLI?) tanks would not be.

Plastic containers seems to be the preferred method of storage which does go against the letter of the law (max 5l plastic, 10l metal) but the implication was that a well maintained air tight plastic container was going to be generally more appropriate than a metal one so I think he has applied a bit of common sense to that one.

I specifically questioned my use, that is a bright red plastic 12litre fuel tank marked as flammable so probably approved for storage - I haven't given my tank much of a look over to see exactly how it was marked. As it was still a relatively small quantity and an approved container, it would be highly unlikely that anyone would chase me to the letter of the law even in the event of say a fire at home. In my case, I would be unlikely to be storing 12l of fuel at home anyhow as the tank would just have residual fuel from the last trip. But I'm really not sure what the implications would be for a larger container.

These are of course my interpretation of the PLA's policy for my area for domestic use.

My PLA gave me 15 minutes of his time and was very helpful. Suggest that people find out who their PLA is and give them a call to discuss their own personal circumstances.
I'm afraid I have FAR more important things to do than check the rules of storing a bit of petrol. Life is complicated enough!
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Old 10 January 2013, 06:19   #13
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^^^^ +1 , fill tanks/cans and use common sense
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Old 10 January 2013, 08:23   #14
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You all realisee that pretty much every fuel tank lurking under the back of your car is "plastic"?

I get the feeling that the preoblem with boat tanks is "are they a fuel tank or are they a container. Those of us used to them know what they are. Someone who wouldn't know which end of a boat was the front might be excused for thinking you were trying to take the P f you rocked up without the boat, as I'm sure they get their fill of numpties trying to fill tupperware & the like......
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Old 10 January 2013, 08:23   #15
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As a law abiding citizen myself with concern for my neighbourhood properties (my neighbourhood has lots of pine trees and fires in the surrounding forests and heathland are all too common in the summer and I would rather not be the one responsible for starting a fire the wrong side of the fire break) let alone burning my own house down, 15 minutes of my time was worth it just to have it confirmed that 12 litre plastic container is acceptable to the people that would be responsible for sending me to jail in the event that I had a fire that was caused/fuelled by storing petrol in a plastic container more than twice as large as the letter of the law.
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