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Old 19 January 2009, 10:28   #11
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Obviously different countries have different prices on engine packages and fuel packages, so direct comparison is useless, but to answer your question I do know of a Revenger Rib with an Ilmor V10 in it - it goes very well too!
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When a boat looks that good who needs tubes!!!
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Old 20 January 2009, 22:29   #12
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Obviously different countries have different prices on engine packages and fuel packages, so direct comparison is useless, but to answer your question I do know of a Revenger Rib with an Ilmor V10 in it - it goes very well too!
And it sounds a lot better than a diesel............

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Old 21 January 2009, 12:08   #13
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Having had a cruiser with a petrol outdrive, I would say that if you are going to use a petrol engine, an outboard is far better than an inboard. They are easier to access, cheaper to service and as has been pointed out already they take up no space in the boat. The final nail in the coffin as far as I am concerned is that if you operate in shallow water, lifting up the leg of an outdrive is liable to cause you problems. Although theoretically they are able to be lifted nearly out of the water while running, in practice it can damage the universal joint (or whatever it is called, I think it is like the CV joint on an old Mini) or pull off the gaiters and let water into areas where it should not go.

If you decide on a diesel engine for economy, ease of maintenance etc. there is virtually no choice but to have an inboard setup but if there was a diesel outboard that was no so heavy it would tip up the boat I am sure it would be a better option.
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Old 23 January 2009, 07:23   #14
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Hi,I thought the main reason for having a diesel taking capital cost and fuel out of the equation was for reliability in the mairine environment ie no H.T system to worry about.There is a large l.p.g market for''petrol'' engines in Australia.There is plenty of ventilation in a R.I.B but I would not fancy it myself.
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Old 24 January 2009, 20:19   #15
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One other thing I forgot to mention that would put me off is that possible petrol vapour in a sealed engine compartment on a petrol inboard would scare the sh&t out of me!!

It is probably an irrational fear but a fear all the same...
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Old 24 January 2009, 22:46   #16
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One other thing I forgot to mention that would put me off is that possible petrol vapour in a sealed engine compartment on a petrol inboard would scare the sh&t out of me!!

It is probably an irrational fear but a fear all the same...
Fully justified but that's what a bilge blower is for.

I remember once cleaning the distributor and alternator on my 110 V8 with trike cleaning spray. It was a cold day and indoors. I started the engine. There was a load pop and a flash from the alternator. It sounded exactly like a diode blowing.

Tried again and there was a hell of a bang. The dizzy cap had blown off even though it was properly secured with very strong clips. Put it back on and everything was fine but the forces must have been amazing.

Now I use a hairdryer to make sure it has all evaporated first.
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Old 20 February 2009, 06:33   #17
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Everyone
Thanks for the replies. The blokes across the road were I am building my Rib have given me an 175 johnson outboard, so I am going to see if I can get it going and stick it on the transom and see how it goes.This motor is not going to be on the rib forever. So when it comes to getting a new engine I think I will take the best deal at the time, as it doesn't seem to matter what you put on the rib, as long as you have enough power and the boat is balanced all types of engines have their pros and cons.
rpm
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Old 20 February 2009, 08:41   #18
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Errr, no. That's what good rigging is for.
A vapour sensor & the blower are just extra proctection.

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Fully justified but that's what a bilge blower is for.
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Old 20 February 2009, 08:53   #19
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I'm not sure I agree.

Show me a 600hp outboard?
In fact, show me a 600hp diesel motor that won't destroy a standard (ie bravo) drive.

It's actually a pair of universal joints, not the CV joints like mini's had.

Easier to access - well, if I were at sea and had a breakdown, I'd rather have my head in the engine bay to fix it than hangover over the back.

Cheaper to service - A service is oil filters, oil, plugs, impeller. The plugs for my opti are, IIRC, 30 quid a pop! The plugs for my old merc V8's were about a fiver. The fuel filters are exactly the same.

Reliable - Outboards suffer from the brackets being weak, it's very possible to break them regularly. Merc offshore ones were the strongest, and cookee still broke em regularly. Outboards won't survive a proper stuff, once water has gone down the inlet it's prob game over. An inboard has a much higher chance of surving a stuff. Diesel even more so than petrol.

Re shallow water beaching - each to their own, I wouldn't want my boat on the beach, or at risk from running aground. But if you are running a rescue boat, it's a fair comment.

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Having had a cruiser with a petrol outdrive, I would say that if you are going to use a petrol engine, an outboard is far better than an inboard. They are easier to access, cheaper to service and as has been pointed out already they take up no space in the boat. The final nail in the coffin as far as I am concerned is that if you operate in shallow water, lifting up the leg of an outdrive is liable to cause you problems. Although theoretically they are able to be lifted nearly out of the water while running, in practice it can damage the universal joint (or whatever it is called, I think it is like the CV joint on an old Mini) or pull off the gaiters and let water into areas where it should not go.

If you decide on a diesel engine for economy, ease of maintenance etc. there is virtually no choice but to have an inboard setup but if there was a diesel outboard that was no so heavy it would tip up the boat I am sure it would be a better option.
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Old 20 February 2009, 17:31   #20
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Cheaper to service - A service is oil filters, oil, plugs, impeller. The plugs for my opti are, IIRC, 30 quid a pop! The plugs for my old merc V8's were about a fiver. The fuel filters are exactly the same.
That sounds like cheaper to service if you do it all yourself and probably ignoring the time spent. I used to spend hundreds every year on outdrive servicing alone.

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Re shallow water beaching - each to their own, I wouldn't want my boat on the beach, or at risk from running aground. But if you are running a rescue boat, it's a fair comment.
I wasn't talking about beaching. Try spending a season in Christchurch Harbour.
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