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Old 02 August 2014, 09:30   #1
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Outboard transport lock

Does anyone else get a little 'OCD' about the correct position to have the Outboard lock in..?

I just spent 5mins today (and not for the first time either.!) messing around with the PTT untill i was comfortable with tension.

Too much and i worry the rams are under load and/or the transport lock could break if i hit a bump.

Too loose and i worry that it's not actually doing its job and putting strain on the rams.

I know a lot of you use a wood chock when transporting, i've seem them bungeed in place. I'm in the fortunate position that i only need to tow for 15mins before i'm at the slip- so feel this method is a little overkill.

Help cure an old man of his ritual every time i prep the boat.

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Old 02 August 2014, 09:40   #2
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My understanding is that the lock is only there to enable you to work on the engine !

I've ALWAYS used a transom saver but we do go 350 miles each way!!!!!

It might be overkill but I still fret......
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Old 02 August 2014, 11:45   #3
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The lock should be OK for pretty much all travel - certainly for 15mins

If you are really worried don't buy the transom saver, just cut a wooden block to fit so it sits between the engine and the engine fittings on the transom.

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Old 02 August 2014, 12:39   #4
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I would use a block of wood over a transom saver all day long (if i was towing a great distance)

I suppose my question is:

Should there be play felt on the lock(i.e you could get a fag paper in the gap) or should it be stiff..?
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Old 03 August 2014, 00:20   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wibs View Post
I would use a block of wood over a transom saver all day long (if i was towing a great distance)
Been over this before, if you care to search for it.

I preferred the transom saver as it triangulates the top of the transom (triangle formed by the saver, the transom, and the trailer.) The transom moves much less with this setup than with the transom being supported just by the tubes (I used to see the transom top rocking a couple of inches before going to the transom saver on an Achilles 14/Honda 40.)

But, to each his own.

jky
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Old 04 August 2014, 03:22   #6
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the lock is NOT designed for towing, and should not be used for that. There are many devises on the market, but I found that the leg resting on a faily large block of wood is/ was a lot safer, and dont forget to cover the prop.when towing on the roads.
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Old 04 August 2014, 03:44   #7
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IMO an engine tilted in the up position creates a lot of torque when driven over any bump/undulation in the road when towing. The downward pressure and twisting of the transom must be quite great. I would not use the the lock but having the A frame, I prefer to tie a supporting rope using the lorry driver's hitch knot. That way the engine gets independent support as well as from the transom.
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Old 04 August 2014, 06:26   #8
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Ok.....

Forget about towing for the minute. (as i know transom savers/blocks of wood debate has been well discussed on this forum)

When i store the rib, in my garage, on the outboard lock, what sort of tension should it have..??

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Old 04 August 2014, 10:22   #9
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If storing in the down position, no lock at all. The idea is to keep the hydraulic ram enclosed in its housing, avoids rusting and not being exposed to air and not taking any pressure.
When builders leave site at the end of the day, any machinery is left with no rams showing in the rest position - do the same.
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