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Old 11 October 2001, 06:36   #1
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'Outboard Muff'

Hi there

I mentioned in an earlier post that I flushed my engine out with fresh water after use. We have a plastic barrel with a 'transom' fitted. I've just read an article in Rib International Online ( www.ribmagazine.com ) that spoke of this but mentioned an 'Outboard Muff'. What the heck is one of these?

Cheers

Keith Hart
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Old 11 October 2001, 07:36   #2
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This is two rubber/plastic cups attached together by some springy material (normally metal) one has a hose connecter fitted you then slip this over the water intake in the leg turn the water on and start the engine. Hope this helps

John
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Old 11 October 2001, 07:38   #3
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Muffs!

They attach over the water inlets of the outboard- connect a hose and you can then flush the engine.
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Old 11 October 2001, 12:34   #4
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My last two Honda 4-stroke engines (75 and 130 hp) both had a rubber-capped housing inside of which was a brass(?) nozzle onto which you could attach a standard "Hozelock" type connector and thus a hosepipe.
This helped me, being permanently marina-moored, as Ididn't have to lean out too far back to connect up and could leave the process while I carried on with something else.
Maybe other engines have this type of fitment too?
Cheaper than buying muffs.
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Old 13 October 2001, 19:24   #5
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At the local Yacht club we call them "ear muffs". They are a great piece of kit; we always run the rescue boat outboards on them before each launch to warm them up and make sure that they will start easily after launching. They also get a quick run after lifting out to remove salt deposits and check the tell-tale hole is clear.
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Old 18 October 2001, 07:34   #6
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My honda 130 has an attachment to flush the engine but as this is attached to the 'head' I am never to sure if I should run the engine as there is no water supply to the pump which may be running dry. does anyone know the answer ?
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Old 18 October 2001, 12:09   #7
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I don't know the precise answer to your question.
Is there a Mr. Honda out there?
However, why run the engine?
My understanding is that injecting fresh water through the flushing nozzle permeates all the bits that it is supposed to wash out and then exits BOTH through the normal water exit port when running at sea, and through the rear of the prop boss.
I used to keep my boat permanently on the water in a marina and after lifting the engine up to a position clear of the water, flush it through (engine not running) and then leave it.
Did that for a few years with no problems.
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Old 18 October 2001, 13:27   #8
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Engine flush

Quite right Brian, the new generation outboards have the hose fitting for flushing the engine with fresh water, you do not need to run the engine.If you inssist on running the engine just ensure water is exiting out the port.
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Old 20 October 2001, 17:36   #9
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All the recent big Suzuki 2 strokes such as the 100 V4 have a flushing inlet high up on the side of the main engine cowling. This is fine if all you want to do is flush the engine, but we always run our club engines for a while to make sure they are running OK (and warmed up) before launching. This port only puts water down into the oulet side of the water pump, so I dont believe it would be safe to run the engine on this flushing point; we use ear muffs so the pump is used as well. I think the same applies to the Hondas.
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Old 21 October 2001, 03:48   #10
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My 15 hp Mariner is 'officialy' flushed out by removing the prop and connecting a hose. You then run water through the engine.

I did not want to take the prop off unless absolutley necessary. I just feel that I would risk making it loose in some way then loose it when out in the boat - a sort of 'if it aint broke, don't fix it'.

I simply drop the engine into my large plastic barrel with home made transom, which is full of fresh water, then run the engine for a couple of minutes untill it is nice and warm and the water is comming warm from the drain hole at the top.

This is a simple solution to the problem which means that it actually gets done when needed.

I suppose that this would not be practical with your bigger engines?

Cheers

Keith (feeling flushed) Hart
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