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Old 22 October 2001, 01:12   #11
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Keith,

You are absolutely right with your method. The same one could be carried out with large engines, BUT. You have to put the barrel under the engine instaed of the engine in the barrel. Then you must remove the barrel and this seams to be rather difficult with the barrel filled with water. So you have to drain the water from the barrel, prior moving it. No question it's the best cooling method among all. Because of the difficulties on practice most of us use the muffs instead.
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Old 22 October 2001, 12:04   #12
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Keith

I use exactly the same method with my 15 Merc (similar OB, only with Merc stickers and black colour). The water intake is under the cavitation plate and it's not easy to fit the "ear muff" type flushing system.
By the way, I would recommend that you remove the prop at least once a year and clean and grease the prop shaft with suitable grease. That will protect the prop shaft against the corrosion and prevent the propeller to stick to the shaft.

Jari
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Old 03 November 2002, 08:52   #13
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Hi I remember that over the past couple of years there have been discussions about 'winterisation' etc. and engine flushing. I've just found this picture of the device I use so here it is. By the way guess who made it? Yup, Charlie.

Keith (good old Charlie) Hart
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Old 03 November 2002, 10:12   #14
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Hi folks

Now this is where I look a fool

Does anyone flush out inboard engines, or do they have enough protection in the form of anodes on the saltwater side of the cooling system.

I know the the engine is cooled via a heat exchanger but would there be any benefit to fitting a flushing system to the saltwater side of the heat exchanger ?.

Even if the RIB is kept in a marina, which mine will be (when it arrives ) freshwater hoses are usually available.

Would it help the lifespan of the heat exchanger or is there not a need for flushing ?.

Also on the subject of anodes is it better to keep a outdrive (bravo 2) fully submerged and have all anodes in the water or fully raised where the prop etc is out of the water ?.

Regards Gary
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Old 03 November 2002, 12:44   #15
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Gary flushing inboard

I see no reason why a boat sitting in a marina cannot still be flushed using muffs if you have a freshwater hose available...

At the end of the day if you towed your inboard back home on a trailer, what would you do..... flush the engine out on a hose I suspect

place the hosed muffs on outleg, run tap and lower leg back into water to flush.....In my humble opinion this can only be of benefit

With regards to lifting the leg when sat in the marina, I would think this is a must as it will quickly get fouled up otherwise

The yaghty people hang sacrificial anodes from their boats and this may be something that you could consider, hanging a sacrificial anode from the leg ??? Worth a thought
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Old 03 November 2002, 15:03   #16
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Garygee
I suggest you take professional advice on this.
Some points:
1. My boat is always in a marina and never out on a trailer except for repair/maintenance.
It has never been flushed. Doesn't seem to need it?
2. There is a flushing point on the leg but the strong probability is that this will not supply sufficient water to the engine. I THINK (but dont know) that the water entering through the leg also circulates around the engine to cool it. And a big inboard requires A LOT of cooling.
3. The engine and the leg have quite a lot of sacrificial anodes designed in. As long as these are changed/refreshed regularly you should be OK.
4. Certainly on my boat you cannot raise the leg clear of the water. A big inboard diesel and a heavy leg combine to ensure the whole of your leg is well below the waterline. So even if you do flush-as soon as you detach the hose, the leg is automatically below waterlevel again.

As I said-get professional advice (your boat builder MUST give you this advice for free). Mine said " As long as you have the boat properly serviced you do not worry about such things".
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Old 03 November 2002, 15:13   #17
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Oh bugger, flushing? Muffs?? I'm lost already and I am just about to get my first engine to power my sib!!
TLS.
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Old 03 November 2002, 17:13   #18
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Flushing Inboards

Flushing outboards with raw water cooling (and inboards with raw water cooling) is much more important than flushing inboards with a heat exchanger. Reason is that your heat exchanger can be serviced much more easily than the waterways in the block of a raw water cooled engine. Yachts and motor cruisers don't ever get flushed - the intake is usually under the hull near the keel. Our hard boat has never been flushed. Unfortunately some inboards are raw water cooled (mercruiser petrols, I think) and need need flushing or else they eventually die!
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Old 04 November 2002, 08:04   #19
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Some interesting replies.

The engine arangement means that the cooling does not go through the leg but has a seperate cooling intake. This means I could shut of the salt water intake and open a flushing point, closing both and trapping fresh water in the heat exchanger if required if benificial.

The enine is fresh water cooled (Yanmar 240hp), but was curious but unsure as I know that you need diferent anodes in fresh water and so it could have been worse in freshwater with the wrong anodes then in salt water with the right anodes.

This was also the reason for the outdrive question, I know the drives are well protected (Bravo 2) but would like to have as much out of the water as poss to prevent fouling BUT in rasing the leg and no dought lifting some of the anodes out of the water would the be sufficient anodes left in the water to do there job.

Anyway as Brian said the manufactures must give you this info, but would the engine manufacture(Yanmar) out drive manufacture(Mercruise) of the boat manufacture (Ribcraft).

Also on anodes was shocked the UK prices for anodes 65+VAT a set
Then when I looked at the states, got quoted $35. a set plus $30-$50 shipping.As i am told I may need 2 sets a year as the boat will be in the water all year I plan to order a few sets from the states, or does anyone know somwhere in the UK whos prices are realistic.

US Prices 5 sets $35*5 +$50 P&p =$225 (145+ VAT approx)
UK Prices 5 sets 65 325+VAT

(me thinks were getting ripped off again )


Anyway will find out when it gets delivered (I hope)

Regards Gary
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Old 04 November 2002, 08:53   #20
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Well both the leg and the Yanmar engine are imported and supported by E P Barrus of Bicester, Oxon. whose techies are very helpful.
Ask your boat manufacturer as well. Why not?
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