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Old 29 July 2012, 11:49   #1
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Outboard Jet vs Outboad Prop

Dear forum,
I would like to buy a new inflatable and the showroom salespeople try to presume me to buy an outboard jet.
What is your opinion on this case.
Will it be faster?
Will it be safer with all the ropes and plastic bags that the sea is hiding?
What about fuel consumption ?
Will the HydroJet outboard be less efficient if I put a few friends more on the boat? Will the weight slow down the speed?
Sorry for all these questions but I am very confused.
I had an outboard with normal prop and twice they stole my prop in the parking plus when very shallow I had to lift the engine.
Of course I have to admit that in very rough sea conditions the boat felt very steady, I don't know if the jet acts the same.
The jet from the other side maneuvers perfect.
Thank you for your time
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Old 29 July 2012, 13:30   #2
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I've never driven a jet, but generally they will only make sense to people with very specific needs. A jet outward is still going to need tilted in shallow water, although the consequences of occassional low speed contact might be less costly than a prop. A plastic bag will still have the potential to block cooling ports. I'm not sure about ropes, but I'd guess there will be a size with potential to get stuck in the jet. Jets are generally considered 30% less efficient. If you are loading a prop driven boat heavily you can quickly and cheaply swap the prop to suit the situation.

There are situations where a jet just makes sense but normal leisure use won't normally justify the po's con's even without looking at cost.
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Old 29 July 2012, 13:37   #3
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Simple.
Don't.
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Old 29 July 2012, 13:52   #4
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I don't know where you live but here in Europe we don't tend to have jet drive outboards so few of us will have had any experience of them. You may be better off trying an american forum as jet units are frequently used on inland waterways there.
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Old 29 July 2012, 15:55   #5
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Dude you know the outboard is more reliable than jets. If there is a price difference then you buy what you are most compatible
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Old 29 July 2012, 16:01   #6
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Jets were really popular in the US back in the 70's and 80's as ski boats (which means inland lakes and rivers over here, for the most part.) Makes sense, as no prop to slice and dice. Most were grossly overpowered things; a friend's boat was powered by a gas 400-odd cubic inch engine.

Fast forward 40 years, and most ski boats have returned to props (I think.) Maintenance and efficiency are probably the main reasons, but that's just a guess. I'm not a skier. I don't think the motors have gotten any smaller, though.

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Old 29 July 2012, 18:43   #7
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Jets serve one purpose only...to drive in shallow water. They handle poorly, are less fuel efficient, have less "bite" in the water, and don't have many benefits. If you are worried about someone getting cut with a prop do like the rescue boats and put a prop guard on.

I have owned my share of boats, with the first being a way overpowered jet boat with a big block 455 pumped up. Slow speeds it was a pain in the butt to drive. For years after the Sea Swirl open bow with a 90 horse Yamaha 2 stroke outboard served me well. Then I got my Nautique that I put over a thousand hours on. Plus all my friends boats which is probably in the hundreds of comp boats. Now I have another outboard with a regular old prop. Once in a great while I wish it was a jet when driving close to or in less than 6 inches of water, which is my current draft.
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Old 29 July 2012, 19:04   #8
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Jets handle poorly? I would like to see you do this with anything else..


Guess it depends how good a driver you are.

They are vague on the steering at slow speeds until you get the hang of it, but once mastered you can perform amazing manoeuvres. They are less efficient than a prop, but the other benefits do it for me.
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Old 30 July 2012, 02:39   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rokraider View Post
They are vague on the steering at slow speeds until you get the hang of it
That is what I was referring to when I meant handled poorly. My flat bottom would walk all over the place instead of going straight at idle. Around the docks they are actually pretty easy to drive vs a direct or V-drive, which do take mastering since they only back one direction unless you know exactly how to work the throttle and wheel. PWC's handle fairly well around the docks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rokraider View Post
but once mastered you can perform amazing manoeuvres. They are less efficient than a prop, but the other benefits do it for me.
I owned a squirt boat and know of the benefits. For the open ocean though they are not the best option. For running rapids there is nothing that compares, and I said that in my first post.

PWC's can do amazing tricks too.

What is the new Mercruiser park system? That is a sweet setup for around the dock handling.
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Old 30 July 2012, 04:30   #10
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Sea Doo has a new PWC with a brake; is that what you're talking about? It's just a bucket, same as boats have had for years. Apparently nobody thought to put one on a PWC before.

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