Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 25 July 2019, 11:56   #1
Member
 
Locozodiac's Avatar
 
Country: Other
Town: Lima-Peru
Boat name: Nautile
Make: Sea Rider 450 Rib
Length: 4m +
Engine: Tohatsu 5/18/30 HP
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,826
Motor Overheats, Salt Water Use.-

When motor overheats or smokes through the peeing port soon after you have installed a new impeller or whole new water pump, have poked a plastic cannula through the peeing port with no avail, it's proper time for a full powerhead preventive maintenance.

Boaters assumes that running their motors with fresh water for long time periods on muffs, barrel, flushing ports will fix the issue, wrong, won't fix anything, not even running any motor on pure vinegar, once salt layers begins to build up on the entire cooling water system the motor had it.

This prime pic example corresponds to a Yam 15 HP motor used as an aux to push a 1.5 ton sailboat when wind is scarce, has max 100 run hours, has never been flushed with fresh water as lives permanently attached at back of the sailboat.

This reluctant boater finally understood that an internal preventive maintenance was the way to go. Don't like partial powerhead cleaning maintenances. like full ones, that's removing the entire powerhead from the pan, cylinder, thermo and exhaust covers, squirting WD-40, Carb Cleaner, pure Vinegar on every possible water path, hole and poking them with a wooden sushi stick to remove salt build ups mechanically till are impeccable clean as when factory delivered. It's the only way to assure 100% effective cooling.

Will need to order a complete gasket set, clean well all related cooling water parts, install new gaskets, torque them to factory specs with a good quality torque wrench. State of the art Norbar is my favorite brand.

Happy Boating
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Cylinder Head.JPG
Views:	82
Size:	131.4 KB
ID:	130208   Click image for larger version

Name:	Exhaust Cover 1.JPG
Views:	86
Size:	180.3 KB
ID:	130209   Click image for larger version

Name:	Exhaust Cover 2.JPG
Views:	87
Size:	163.6 KB
ID:	130210   Click image for larger version

Name:	Prop.JPG
Views:	81
Size:	125.2 KB
ID:	130211  
__________________

__________________
Locozodiac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25 July 2019, 13:51   #2
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Retford
Boat name: Spy-sea-one
Make: Mercury
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki Outboard/25/4
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 5,249
Disagree I keep a marine reef tank my pumps are running 24/7/365 mineral build up occurs and every so often I soak in citric acid or vinegar to desolve doing the same periodically prevents build up flushing is imperative as soon as the engine is out of the water too
__________________

__________________
jeffstevens763@g is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 26 July 2019, 03:29   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: north ayrshire
Boat name: charlie girl
Make: reiver 3.8/regal3760
Length: 10m +
Engine: 40hp 2st 2x6lp 315
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 2,166
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffstevens763@g View Post
Disagree I keep a marine reef tank my pumps are running 24/7/365 mineral build up occurs and every so often I soak in citric acid or vinegar to desolve doing the same periodically prevents build up flushing is imperative as soon as the engine is out of the water too
Comparison to a fish tank isnt realy a good comparison to a boat engine. As loco shows in his picture a lot of the build up in an engine isnt actually salt but expanded aluminium corrosion which can be 20 or 30 times its original size.
Whilst products that disolve salt can help and sometimes cure an overheating problem there will be times as loco shows that a full strip down is the only answer.
Modern 4 strokes are far more susceptible to this kind of thing than old school two strokes due to their smaller water pathways.
Periodic preventive flushing with a cleaning agent would probably benefit most engines but it isnt the cure all answer to an overheating issue
__________________
beamishken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26 July 2019, 09:29   #4
Member
 
Locozodiac's Avatar
 
Country: Other
Town: Lima-Peru
Boat name: Nautile
Make: Sea Rider 450 Rib
Length: 4m +
Engine: Tohatsu 5/18/30 HP
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,826
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffstevens763@g View Post
Disagree I keep a marine reef tank my pumps are running 24/7/365 mineral build up occurs and every so often I soak in citric acid or vinegar to desolve doing the same periodically prevents build up flushing is imperative as soon as the engine is out of the water too
What did you didn't understand about my post, is my English so difficult to read or understand ? The debris formation seen on pics are not metal formations as there's no loss of material due to corrosion going on, it's a form of salt hardened formation easy to clean/brush off with a Dremel rotating tool and proper cleaning bits, small bristles, metal brushes and extreme patience.

Reading your post you have never disassembled before any powerhead down, what you state is a tech fallacy. Doesn't matter if you flush any motor for hours on vinegar, acid, whatever, will only wash thin salt layers, not crusts or thinner water passages due to hard salt sclerosis build ups.

If motor has been running for long hours say 300-500 will have already collected micro salt layers one on top of the other due to repetitive On/Off - Warm/Cold cycles. It's the nature of motors working on salt water, worse if motor lives on top transom and it's never or will never be flushed with fresh water after use.

The only possible way to get 100% rid of salt layers formations already built on all internal water passages is to tear powerhed down as described, squirt pure vinegar, WD-40 on all water paths, let penetrate and scrape off mechnically all water paths with a wooden stick as not to scratch theis surfaces.

Other issues that nobody accounts for are : not all sea oceans contains the same amount of salt, the countries near the equator has more amount of salt contents as there is more water evaporation than on non equator countries. The water paths on all motors are not plain smooth ones, are kind of porous and will enevitably collect salt layers. Sea water motors cools with salt not with the green Kryptonite that car uses that keeps all water paths impeccable clean.

BTW, have tons of information and proven pics stripping motors used on salt water environments if anyone wants to continue with the theme.

Happy Boating
__________________
Locozodiac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26 July 2019, 14:04   #5
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Retford
Boat name: Spy-sea-one
Make: Mercury
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki Outboard/25/4
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 5,249
I fully understand what your saying even if you have broken English my point is that if you clean regular you will prevent build up that you are showing in your pictures. For your information citric acid will desolve the deposits you have if the mixture is stong enough. Acid is frightening to some but it's a natural acid from fruit when I built my reef I used rock from a sunken reef from millions of years ago built by corals from the elements in seawater the exact same elements you have in your engine it desolves it slowly or as aggressive as you want you can actularly whach it doing it. JW says there is no comparison,the common denominator is sea water so why no comparison. To be brutal if I had an engine in that state I would be ashamed because I didn't do basic maintenance. Anyway you do what you want but prevention is better than cure.

Happy boating
__________________
jeffstevens763@g is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 26 July 2019, 15:41   #6
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: suffolk
Boat name: not yet
Make: Nautica/ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: Yamaha 115 & 60 4str
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 446
so we have all flushed with fresh water ,now we need citric acid to break down the effects of years of salt ,so we have muffs ,maybe a tank and the hose non running adaptor on later four strokes ,,,,,,,assuming there is some mileage in both posters content ,then how do we present these chemicals to our cooling galleries to have some effects ,maybe twice annually ,as a preventitive ?? , thoughts on this very helpful ,could be a very interesting maintainance post ..thankyou

Happy boating
__________________
Orwell boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26 July 2019, 15:58   #7
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Retford
Boat name: Spy-sea-one
Make: Mercury
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki Outboard/25/4
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 5,249
I do mine once a year with no detrimental comments from each service each year on any outboards I've owned
__________________
jeffstevens763@g is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 26 July 2019, 16:11   #8
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: suffolk
Boat name: not yet
Make: Nautica/ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: Yamaha 115 & 60 4str
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 446
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffstevens763@g View Post
I do mine once a year with no detrimental comments from each service each year on any outboards I've owned
sorry ,maybe you have taken my post the wrong way ,i realise you are doing this as preventitive ,,and i want to try same , what i am asking is how , and with what ? what method do you use ?? ,vinigar is cheap ,maybe you fill a tank with that ? i have also seen tablets but not sure how you use them ?
__________________
Orwell boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26 July 2019, 17:34   #9
Member
 
lakelandterrier's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Gloucester
Boat name: Lunasea
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzi 140
MMSI: 232005050
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,378
Have to say, I've always flushed with fresh water for 5min+ after most trips (but if on amarina using daily for a week or so, not) have had no problems .

Do we take the need to religiously flush EVERY run too seriously (given in our northern latitude we may have a less concentrated saline mix.

Don't get me wrong I'm not saying ignore it, but can we over think / worry about this and the practical effects v. the theoretical one?
__________________
Member of the Macmillan Round the Isle of Wight Club
lakelandterrier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27 July 2019, 02:43   #10
Member
 
neil.mccrirrick's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Oldham
Boat name: Miss Isle
Make: Solent 6.9
Length: 6m +
Engine: 225 optimax
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,028
I think it all comes down to your internal worry meter. There are plenty of outboards sat in marina's on swing moorings being used but not flushed. Like most things mechanical imo, if you use it regularly make sure it gets to temperature it become a reliable piece of kit.
__________________

__________________
"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought."
neil.mccrirrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 15:29.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.