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Old 08 October 2015, 14:59   #11
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Each use probably is overkill but it should 100% be drained in winter and some suggest putting antifreeze in just to be safe. Again, your manual will tell you the correct procedure.

I know with our 5.7 it was drained after every trip as this issue is pretty common.

Good luck with it though.
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Old 08 October 2015, 15:52   #12
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'Kin 'eck! This boat is a proper 'Cold shower/50 notes'.

Been down the V8 frost f'ked road myself, it's not uncommon or that simple to avoid.
As mentioned, you may've had a hairline crack in the block due to frost, which has held out for most of the summer, but has finally let go. Emulsified oil somewhere would be the giveaway. Mine blew mousse out of the airfilter.

For future reference, getting all of the water (fresh or sea) out of a vee engine is close to impossible. I used to remove the thermostat and run antifreeze through until it blew blue out of the exhaust and then switch off. The added bonus being, antifreeze has corrosion inhibitors in. The job is a total faff, but at least you can relax and not study the temp forecasts all winter.

Have the repairers explained exactly what the frost incurred damage is?
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Old 08 October 2015, 15:55   #13
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Have the reapairers explained exactly what the frost incurred damage is?
Those will be the Grim Reapairers then?
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Old 08 October 2015, 16:17   #14
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Those will be the Grim Reapairers then?
It does appear that way.
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Old 13 October 2015, 02:40   #15
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Frost plugs are on them all in strategic places. The idea being as frozen water expands the frost plugs will be the first to burst saving the block from potential crack-damage. The tell tale sign, that I don't believe you mentioned when you first started the engine while unmooring the lines and is crucial to the above, was there clouds of white smoke while in warmed before shutting down? White smoke (steam) means two things..cracked head/block or blown head gasket through the water journals..with water entering one or more cylinders. Don't fool yourself rip-off engine overhaul places have a backyard full of junk heads/blocks you could be shown. As I mentioned the key is if any white smoke (steam) clouded around the stern on startup. Good luck.
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Old 13 October 2015, 02:44   #16
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One more thing. The pictures of the block-cylinder bores are not new. That much rust, depending how long you waited before the engine was (apparently) dismantled is the key.
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Old 13 October 2015, 03:09   #17
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"Tried to start it and it wouldn't have it."

Did it spin or was it "hydro-locked". I've had exactly the same issue with a failed manifold on a V6 Merc.

Were the manifolds/risers replaced with the new engine ?
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Old 13 October 2015, 04:49   #18
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What are commonly referred to as 'frost plugs' or 'freeze plugs' - more correctly called 'core plugs' or 'welch washers' - are simply plugs used to fill the holes resulting from when the part is sand cast & were the locations of the sand forms used to form the internal passageways/cavities of the part.
That they sometimes pop out if coolant freezes led to the belief that they were designed in to prevent damage to the block.
They can be a PITA if no corrosion inhibitor is used as they corrode from the inside & sod's law & my own experience says that the least accessible will be the one that starts to leak!
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Old 13 October 2015, 05:34   #19
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I didn't notice any white smoke when engine started but to be honest I wasn't looking either. The engine was still in boat for a fortnight after the initial non start. The risers where replaced when engine was new in 2008
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Old 13 October 2015, 07:44   #20
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It looks to me like the risers/ manifolds were the problem have you confirmed the block is cracked?
If frost damage they either crack on the outside & leak water into the boat or they crack inside the valley under the inlet manifold & fill the sump with water
The block might be ok & if your lucky you might get away with 1 or more pistons & a hone & re ring
That piston has been run for a while with water gettingo n top of it to cause the pitting
5 years out of a set of manifolds isn't unusual if not flushed or drained
If the block isn't cracked the water in the oil could just be from what has seeped past the piston over a period when stood idle
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