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Old 16 August 2004, 17:56   #1
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Jump-starting a RIB

The battery on my RIB is fairly flat - too flat to start it. Is it safe / a good idea to jump start the engine with the car so I can run it and charge it up (I lack a battery charger and don't intend to buy one!).

If so, what's the prescribed method (bearing in mind I have owned a car for less than a year and have never had to do this).

TIM
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Old 16 August 2004, 18:02   #2
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You can buy a battery booster pack pretty cheaply nowadays, Makro apparently have some good deals. Make sure you get one that has enough cranking amps, they are a useful accessory to have, some have lights, 12v ciggie type sockets and air pumps. I do think they can be bought for about 30 or so, I bought one 18mths ago, and have had great use out of it as a supplementary power supply for lights e.t.c.

This is where I got mine from with free delivery :-

http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/...93843&id=10493

Good luck
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Old 16 August 2004, 18:12   #3
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I've usually removed the battery from the car to "jump-start" boats. Works OK. Depends how close you can get the car to the boat really! (and the length of cables/jump leads etc.)

When removing a battery from a car, detach the negative (black) first. When re-connecting, re-attach the positive (red) first.

If you're using jump leads with croc clips, attach the positive (red) first and after you've completed the start, remove the neg (black) first.

By following the above, you will avoid welding the spanner or jump lead to the car body if you inadvertently touch the spanner or jump lead on the car's body.
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Old 16 August 2004, 18:24   #4
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I've got a Makro power/jump starting pack and I think it's great. Used it last year for the trailer tent lights and TV and when someones car wouldn't start at the camp site I used it for that as well! It plugs into the car ciggi lighter to charge as you drive and also has an adaptor for the mains as well.

The best thing is it only cost me something like 20.00 inc and it's so light you can take it to sea, so that when your cool box has drained your power during a picknick in your fav. bay you can get the old girl going again.

Beat that if you can!
Andy
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Old 16 August 2004, 18:46   #5
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It's completely realistic to pull start a 40 from the emergency start pulley on the flywheel. More of an issue is once it's running, I doubt there is much output from the stator to charge the battery, they normally only have a v. small output. Surely it's gotta be cheaper to buy a cheap charger than it is to buy a new battery cos the current one is shagged from being left discharged too long?
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Old 16 August 2004, 18:57   #6
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Ditto

Ditto on the Powerpack suggestion!

Very common to see RIBs with flat battery after the owner has been playing with the GPS while the boat was sitting at home on the trailer.

I'll defer to the mechanics on here but generally we have found that a few hours running each day for a couple of days will have a flat battery back in action. However a good charger will always be a better bet to recharge them.

The other solution if buying a new boat is to have two batteries with one of those nice VETUS heavy duty battery selector switches. We have an SOP (standard operating procedure) here in the school that only battery one is used for shore work ( playing with electronics etc with the engine off). We switch to both while running and if battery one fails to start, battery two is always fully charged.


Best wishes,

Stuart
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Old 16 August 2004, 19:08   #7
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Stuart,

I have two batteries with the heavy duty switch, I use battery 1 for starting and running, and always battery two for overnight on the boat, lights, DVD e.t.c. If I have been using battery 2 overnight or whilst moored, I normally leave it on 2 or if it is a bit run down, start on 1 and then switch to 2 to charge it. Should I leave the switch on both when driving the boat, and if so, how does it know which battery to throw the charge at, and how does it share the charge?
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Old 16 August 2004, 19:22   #8
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Battery switching

Hi Pete,

Our system on the RIBs is quite simple with either or both batteries being charged or discharged depending on where the selector switch is.

Generally speaking, when the engine is running, switch to both for charging.

If you are using a significant amount of aux gadgets ( lights radios fridge tv etc.) consider getting a diode splitter fitted ( if you do not already have one).

These are standard fit on most cruisers. They are a kind of one way valve for charging. While the engine is running, all batteries are charging but when the engine is off, the aux gadgets are only allowed power from their own dedicated "domestic" battery and your dedicated engine battery is therefore always charged ( unless you wear it down trying to start up !!)

Any marine mechanic would be able to fit a splitter system for you for small money.

Hope this helps !

Stuart
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Old 16 August 2004, 19:39   #9
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Might try and get one of these cheap chargers. I don't think my battery's "shagged" quite yet Meme; it's only been flat a couple of days, and yes, pull starting is always an option.
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Old 17 August 2004, 04:38   #10
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Towsure do Leisure batteries at a reasonable price 110 amdps at 39.95 Buy two of em and a battery changeover swich and you should be good for a while
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