Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 04 November 2018, 23:32   #1
Member
 
Country: New Zealand
Town: Auckland
Make: Gemini Waverider 550
Length: 5m +
Engine: Johnson 90hp
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 74
Hydraulic steering

I've never owned or used a boat with hydraulic steering before. When moving my wheel there is a lag/slack before the movement translates into the engine moving. Is this usual or should it be immediate?

I've not checked the fluid, so that will be on my ever-lengthening list of things to do once I finish my DIY at home and move on to getting the boat ready for Christmas (my wife has even suggested we head out on Boxing Day which is a first....although remember that will be summer here...).

So far the list consists of changing the oil in the lower unit, rebuilding the water pump, changing the thermostats (all following a run back in at low tide and the hot light coming on numerous times during our next trip out), new spark plugs, get the gauges working, change the fuel water separating filter for one with a drain, drain and inspect the fuel tank and fit new LED lights to the trailer ahead of its Warrant of Fitness (yes, those of you in the UK have one less thing to worry about...trailers here are registered in their own right, have a yearly warrant of fitness/MoT and pay their own road tax).
__________________

__________________
RichardinNZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05 November 2018, 01:45   #2
Member
 
beerbelly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: teesside
Make: valiant v570
Length: 5m +
Engine: mercury 100
MMSI: 232012453
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 982
yes mate iv always found a small amount of free play with hydraulic steering its not immediate like a car its not really noticeable once under way tho
__________________

__________________
beerbelly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05 November 2018, 02:06   #3
Member
 
Country: New Zealand
Town: Auckland
Make: Gemini Waverider 550
Length: 5m +
Engine: Johnson 90hp
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 74
Thanks...puts my mind at rest.
__________________
RichardinNZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05 November 2018, 06:53   #4
Member
 
Simonh66's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Southampton
Boat name: Gecko
Make: Valiant
Length: 5m +
Engine: 115 Optimax
MMSI: 235060442
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 53
RIBase
I have the same boat as Beerbelly & have a little play
__________________
Simonh66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 November 2018, 12:49   #5
Member
 
Country: New Zealand
Town: Auckland
Make: Gemini Waverider 550
Length: 5m +
Engine: Johnson 90hp
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 74
Thanks for confirming.
__________________
RichardinNZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09 November 2018, 04:04   #6
Member
 
boristhebold's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Length: 7m +
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,431
The delay/slack issue depends how much, on mine there isnt much delay or slack at all, to be honest ive probably got more slack on the steering in my landrover defender LOL. On your boat your may have a knob on top of the steering boss, undo the knob and with a small funnel pour in some hydraulic fluid, tighten and turn steering wheel a few times left and right then re-open and top up. If lots of slack/delay you may have some air blockage somewhere.

See if you can compare with some other peoples steering, its hard to say here if you have too much slack.
__________________
boristhebold is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09 November 2018, 07:13   #7
Member
 
Phil M's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Whitehaven
Boat name: not sure yet
Make: Destroyer 5.8
Length: 5m +
Engine: 115hp Merc 4st
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 391
How much does the engine move if you try to turn it by hand? More than a degree or two may indicate air in the system. For full peace of mind you can bleed the system. There should be bleed points where the hoses connect to the engine cylinder. Stick a tube on these, loosen them (one at a time) and turn the wheel. If there are no bubbles in the fluid that comes out, all is well. You will need to add more oil to the help if you do this though, to replace that bled out.

Phil M
__________________
Phil M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09 November 2018, 13:39   #8
Member
 
Country: New Zealand
Town: Auckland
Make: Gemini Waverider 550
Length: 5m +
Engine: Johnson 90hp
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 74
Thanks for the advice. I'll try that soon and see how I get on. Do you have to feed in at the helm at the same time as bleeding?

Thanks
__________________
RichardinNZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09 November 2018, 15:38   #9
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Chesterfield
Boat name: Sea Quell
Make: Picton Cobra
Length: 5m +
Engine: Mercury 150 4 Stroke
MMSI: 235038298
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 968
You need to ensure you keep the helm full whilst bleeding,,, otherwise you simply draw air into the system and make it worse. Usually, you have a full bottle of fluid with a hole in the top) connected to the fill hole via a tube and thread adaptor... keep it topped up. Definitely a 2 man job ... whoops, person job
__________________
Jeff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09 November 2018, 15:39   #10
Member
 
Country: New Zealand
Town: Auckland
Make: Gemini Waverider 550
Length: 5m +
Engine: Johnson 90hp
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 74
Thanks. I thought that might be the case....
__________________

__________________
RichardinNZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 14:36.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.