Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 06 April 2008, 13:26   #11
RIBnet admin team
 
Nos4r2's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: The wilds of Wiltshire
Boat name: WhiteNoise/Dominator
Make: Ballistic 7.8/SR5.4
Length: 7m +
Engine: Opti 225/Yam 85
MMSI: 235090687/235055163
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 12,645
RIBase
The ONLY thing I'll say on solder V crimp is there's a reason it's illegal to solder connections on aircraft.


Personally, I wouldn't join the cable at all. I'd make a new cable.
__________________
Need spares,consoles,consumables,hire,training or even a new boat?

Please click HERE and HERE and support our Trade Members.

Join up as a Trade member or Supporter HERE
Nos4r2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2008, 13:33   #12
Member
 
Hightower's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Fareham
Length: 6m +
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 7,855
I'd make a new cable length too. Everything else is a bodge, not worth the risk of the cable detatching, corroding or setting electrolisis in action by getting or allowing the negative and positive joins to get salt water in them.
__________________

__________________
Andy

Looks Slow but is Fast
Member of the ebay Blue RIB cover club.
Hightower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2008, 13:44   #13
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Boat name: Seashell
Make: Redbay
Length: 7m +
Engine: Inboard diesel
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 5,263
This might seem like a really silly question, but why? I have always been of the opinion that a soldered joint is a lot better than a crimped joint, especially on a boat where a crimped connection can work un-done.
__________________
Tim M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2008, 13:54   #14
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hightower View Post
I'd make a new cable length too. Everything else is a bodge, not worth the risk of the cable detatching, corroding or setting electrolisis in action by getting or allowing the negative and positive joins to get salt water in them.
Hightower - not disputing that a whole new cable would be a better solution (although probably expensive, and IIRC not straightforward to fit at the engine end). However: You presumably) have crimped on connectors at both ends of your cable (one at the battery and the other in the engine) why are these any less likely to "detatch" than a connector in the middle? Why is corrosion any more likely to get into these connections (if correctly made and enclosed) than any other electrical connection on the boat? I'm not sure what your electrolysis concern was.

My main concern about the bolt approach (as bodged on my boat) is that if any sharp edges on the nut bolt wear through the protective casing there is a small risk that both positive and negative connections wear through and could short.
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2008, 14:05   #15
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Make: HumberOceanOffshore
Length: 8m +
Engine: Volvo KAD300/DPX
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 4,962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart View Post
My main concern about the bolt approach (as bodged on my boat) is that if any sharp edges on the nut bolt wear through the protective casing there is a small risk that both positive and negative connections wear through and could short.
Bend them, smooth them, pad them, clamp them, stagger them, sleeve them, box them, and any other number of thems.
Be rational not emotive...as you obviously have been since you used a bolt.
__________________
JW.
jwalker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2008, 14:27   #16
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalker View Post
Bend them, smooth them, pad them, clamp them, stagger them, sleeve them, box them, and any other number of thems.
Be rational not emotive...as you obviously have been since you used a bolt.
Jeff thats pretty much what I did - they are staggered offset about 4 inches from each other, sleeved in shrink wrap, secured together with cable ties and all wrapped in insulating tape (it doesn't look pretty - but that reminds me that the joint underneath may not be prefect either!).

Like all of the primitive electrics on my boat it was only meant to be a temporary measure (in this case to test the battery and engine) but actually worked OK so has just remained. Its lasted 2 1/2 years so it can't be too bad. (the last time I went to the boat the joint was under an inch of ice/snow and still seemed to be working fine).
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2008, 14:33   #17
Member
 
Country: Ireland
Town: Castlebar
Boat name: Clewless
Make: Valiant DR 490
Length: 4m +
Engine: 60 hp ETEC
MMSI: Awaitng one
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,239
RIBase
Cable extention

I considered a whole new cable. But it is hard to find the exact spot where it terminates without stripping off a considerable amount of kit.
__________________
two stroke mick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2008, 14:56   #18
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Hamble
Length: 9m +
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 2,317
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalker View Post
Pish. You think a crimp is failsafe?By some, maybe but a nut and bolt will put a pressure of many tons across the joint. After all, when the cable terminates at the battery, it'll just be held to the terminals by.......a nut and bolt.
That terminal, held by the nut and bolt, will be "crimped" onto the cable, same as a butt joint, but with more to go wrong. Take my word for it, I do this as my job, a Butt joint is the correct way, unless your prepared to go to the expense of new cables. Which you'll have to crimp ends on to!!!
__________________
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt!
Dirk Diggler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2008, 14:57   #19
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by two stroke mick View Post
I considered a whole new cable. But it is hard to find the exact spot where it terminates without stripping off a considerable amount of kit.
Even if you can you may find that the fitting that needs to be crimped on is bigger that the hole in the cowl (it is on mine) so the fitting needs attached after the cable is fed through - either you need the right tool and skills to do it right or you will have to pay someone who has. I have proper crimp tool but it doesn't go that big so that was the end of that approach.
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2008, 14:57   #20
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Hamble
Length: 9m +
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 2,317
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim M View Post
This might seem like a really silly question, but why? I have always been of the opinion that a soldered joint is a lot better than a crimped joint, especially on a boat where a crimped connection can work un-done.
That's assuming you know how to solder, where as any fool can crimp!
__________________

__________________
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt!
Dirk Diggler is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:21.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.