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Old 28 September 2007, 12:27   #1
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Engine flushing - do you run your engine?

I'm curious as to whether you old hand RIBbers run the engine or not when you flush it.

Assuming the boat is out of the water, and you are using the hosepipe adaptor to flush, do you run or not? Looking back through some old posts here, it seems Mercury say you can choose whether or not to run the engine. But Yamaha tell you not to. It seems that you could seriously damage your rubber water impeller if you do, as it is getting either no, or very little water to it, and it will overheat.

Presumably, if using muffs there is no danger, as the water is forced up past the impeller under pressure.

But, if you do not run the engine, then the thermostat will be closed (unless you flush very soon after getting the boat out of the water). Therefore, you will only be flushing a portion of the cooling circuit, and not the majority, the important bit all around the head.

Does this make sense, or am I talking rubbish?!
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Old 28 September 2007, 12:45   #2
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Originally Posted by bernithebiker View Post
I'm curious as to whether you old hand RIBbers run the engine or not when you flush it.

Assuming the boat is out of the water, and you are using the hosepipe adaptor to flush, do you run or not? Looking back through some old posts here, it seems Mercury say you can choose whether or not to run the engine. But Yamaha tell you not to. It seems that you could seriously damage your rubber water impeller if you do, as it is getting either no, or very little water to it, and it will overheat.

Presumably, if using muffs there is no danger, as the water is forced up past the impeller under pressure.

But, if you do not run the engine, then the thermostat will be closed (unless you flush very soon after getting the boat out of the water). Therefore, you will only be flushing a portion of the cooling circuit, and not the majority, the important bit all around the head.

Does this make sense, or am I talking rubbish?!


Thats exactly what I was told by 2 dealers now , flush with muffs until the water runs warm out of the exhaust then you know the thermostat is open and the whole system is getting flushed .
Maybe some engines can flush without running but I can't see how .
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Old 28 September 2007, 12:46   #3
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use muffs,tickover only,and you will have no problems
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Old 28 September 2007, 13:10   #4
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use muffs,tickover only,and you will have no problems
What do muffs do?
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Old 28 September 2007, 13:12   #5
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What do muffs do?
.....keep yer lug 'oles warm....
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Old 28 September 2007, 14:18   #6
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Muffs

Muffs are the large rubber suction clamps that go over your water intakes.

They then connect up to the hose pipe.

The Yamaha ones that I have do not work very well. They are supposed to clamp onto the engine leg by spring power alone, but the fit is not tight enough and alot of water leaks out before it even gets into the engine.

The last time I tried to use them, I was getting a telltale jet, but only a weak one. The engine beeped from overheating so I shut it down. My boat shop advised me to tape over the other large grille a touch higher up - a water outlet I believe, but this didn't help much.

Therefore, I went back to the direct hose connector at the top of the engine. BUT, cannot (or at least not supposed to) start the engine in this mode.
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Old 28 September 2007, 14:28   #7
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Muffs are the large rubber suction clamps that go over your water intakes.

They then connect up to the hose pipe.
I think my Mercury is flushed by connecting the hose right by the cowling. What would one do with the muffs in this instance?
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Old 28 September 2007, 14:53   #8
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You either use muffs OR the direct hose connector (if you have one).

I don't think you can (or should) use both at the same time, but you would need two hosepipes (or a 2 way hose splitter) for that anyway.

My question really relates to using the DIRECT hose connector. Can you / do you run your engine when using this? It seems that if this direct connection is high up the engine, near the cowling (like Yamaha), not enough water will reach your water impeller (which is usually down low on the engine leg) and could damage it if the engine is running.
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Old 28 September 2007, 15:32   #9
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Do the muffs in any way muffle the sound of the engine if you are running it out of the water? I imagine it must make one hell of a racket.

Or is that a stupid question?
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Old 28 September 2007, 16:07   #10
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I'm curious as to whether you old hand RIBbers run the engine or not when you flush it.
Depends on what method you use to get water to the engine.

Using muffs and the in-water (for normal running) cooling water pickups, run the engine for long enough to get the thermostat open (which realistically shouldn't take all that long.) You need to make sure that all water intakes are covered (duct tape for the ones that aren't covered by the muffs. On a small Honda, there are a total of 3: One on either side of the leg, and one on the bottom of the anti-ventilation plate. Don't know about others, as I use the hose connector now, so haven't looked.)

Using a hose adaptor on/near the head of the engine, generally you do not run the engine. Input is after the thermostat, so the heads entire water jacket is flushed.

Some manufacturers may have differing instructions (For instance, the leg-mounted hose adaptor on Suzuki's are given a choice to run or not.)

Pretty much what everyone else said, I'm afraid.

Andy: It does usually get a bit loud whenyou're running on muffs. Nowhere near as loud as, say, a Harley wrapping the engine up, but not something you want to do in the wee hours of the morning, either. Tilting the motor up so the water pools in the prop hub *may* help attenuate the noise a bit, but not much.

Berni: You probably won't damage too much running off the direct connection (impeller doesn't need all that much water to self-lube), but why chance it? It's designed to flush using water pressure alone. Running the motor won't accomplish anything since you don't have enough water at the impeller to pump anything, so the only freshwater circulation you're going to get is due to water pressure (i.e. exactly the same as if it was not running.) You may add a bit of heat which will help get salt into solution, but that's not that hard to do anyways. Salt dissolves pretty well in fresh water.

jky
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