Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 04 September 2008, 10:11   #1
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Southampton
Boat name: N/A
Make: EPS Pacific
Length: 4m +
Engine: 40hp Mariner
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 65
Electirc trim tilt conversion

How much would I be looking at to get my outboard converted to electric trim/tilt?

Would the price depend on anything and what sort of things would need fitting?


All help appreciated

thanks
__________________

__________________
Laurence
L4RRY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2008, 10:31   #2
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Buckingham
Make: Ribcraft 4.8
Length: 4m +
Engine: Mariner 75
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 352
eBay or Boats & Outboards occasionally have trim & tilt motors/ rams etc available - but they are big money (200 upwards plus switches & wiring) - I decided it wasn't worth it for my 50hp manual trim/ tilt !

If you are still keen then look up the part numbers in your workshop manual for your outboard and get some quotes ...
__________________

__________________
BumbleAbout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2008, 10:46   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Southampton
Boat name: N/A
Make: EPS Pacific
Length: 4m +
Engine: 40hp Mariner
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 65
I was thinking about 300-400. It was either electric trim tilt or and electric start conversion which to be honest didn't even seem worth doing unless i had teeth on my flywheel. even then that was going to cost about 500!

I've just found launching so difficult without either of these and either one could make the world of difference!

Thanks for your help, i'll check out both sites anyway and speak to the mechanic
__________________
Laurence
L4RRY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2008, 11:10   #4
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Here
Boat name: doggypaddle
Make: Avon 5.4 Searider
Length: 5m +
Engine: yamaha 80
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,107
cheaper to buy another engine with it almost certainly, assuming you finance it by selling your current engine, A PTT unit will be around 1000
__________________
doggypaddle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2008, 11:58   #5
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Oakland CA
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,653
I researched power tilt/trim for my Honda 40. Major parts alone were in excess of $600 US. For an engine that was about $4K new, it seemed a bit excessive. So I replaced the boat.

jky
__________________
jyasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05 September 2008, 05:48   #6
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: Wildheart
Make: Humber/Delta Seasafe
Length: 5m +
Engine: Merc 60 Clamshell
MMSI: 235068449
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,610
Yep, same story here....

I also came to the conclusion that using the current engine as a trade - in would be the cheapest option.
__________________
9D280 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05 September 2008, 07:06   #7
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Inverness
Boat name: none
Make: none
Length: 5m +
Engine: none
MMSI: none
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,908
I did it on an old 60hp Yam about five years ago. 250 delivered for all the bits, fitted and used for 3 years without any problem before I sold the boat. Conversion time around 4 hours splitting the saddle and swopping the guts over.
I bought mine secondhand from the Yam dealer in Dunfermline, can't remember his name, that breaks motors.
__________________
BruceB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11 September 2008, 04:36   #8
Member
 
Country: France
Town: Cannes
Boat name: midkat 550
Make: apoge
Length: 5m +
Engine: 2x50 Tohatsu
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 126
the cheapest solution is to buy an electro-hydraulic tilt/trim accessory made by CMC-USA.
Cost is 600 usd, plus shipping and taxes, but you have a brand new and reliable unit able to work up to 130hp engines.

To install, just remove your motor, screw the CMC to your transom, then screw the motor to CMC unit.
__________________
yorfuoj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11 September 2008, 05:15   #9
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: Wildheart
Make: Humber/Delta Seasafe
Length: 5m +
Engine: Merc 60 Clamshell
MMSI: 235068449
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,610
Looked at that as well, but how many transoms have that much spare weight capacity?

Mine certianly doesn't!
__________________
9D280 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11 September 2008, 05:58   #10
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Southampton
Boat name: SMH Rib / War Shot
Make: Ribtec / Scorpion
Length: 4m +
Engine: 10hp Yam / 150hp opt
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 1,894
RIBase
I've just found launching so difficult without either of these and either one could make the world of difference!

Hi Larry,

I don't want to sound patronising but from what you've posted I think that perhaps you're going about launching / recovering the wrong way. You mentioned in another post about putting the exhaust of the car under water and I think I saw a photo of your boat on the slip at Hamble Point?

The Hamble Point slip is awkward at the best of times and evil when the tide is flowing out at 2-3 knots. Try using the public slip in Hamble Village - it's a bit of a squeeze but you can get down the High Street. There's much less tide on that slip. It's a shallower gradient than Hamble Point so not suitable for driving on and off the trailer but you might find that winching on and off the trailer is not that hard really.

I use that slip for the 6.5 Scorpion and it's fine.

For launching we back to boat onto the slip, un strap it then back down with a little "gusto" and then stamp on the brakes when the trailer wheels are under. Boat shoots off rear of trailer and onlookers appear impressed. Either have a mate in the boat who can then lower the engine and deal with the boat while you deal with the trailer, or, have the boat tied to the trailer with a piece of rope a little longer than the trailer so that once the boat is off you can drive car, boat and trailer back up slip into shallower water where you can take control of the boat.

For recovery we back the trailer into the water so that you can stand on the slip at the rear of the trailer in wellies. The boat is then brought to the rear of the trailer and then clipped onto the winch. Take up the slack on the winch so that the boat is "engaged" with the rear of the trailer. Back whole lot into slightly deeper water and start winding on the winch.

It builds the arm muscles up a bit but at no time are you having to run the engine in shallow water risking your prop or having to drive at the rear of a trailer risking your gelcoat.

This has worked well with 4m, 5.4m Seariders and a 6.5m Scorpion although I must confess on roller type trailers. Is yours rollers or bunks? I've never used a bunked trailer.

I use a Discovery for the 6.5m and an Audi A4 for the 4m Searider.

A pair of wellies is very useful and much cheaper than fitting power trim!

If you would like a hand just let me know. If i'm not busy i'll happily wander down to the slip. A weekday evening would also work well for me if it suits you?


Duncan
__________________

__________________
Searider is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 14:31.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.