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Old 11 October 2008, 15:03   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirk Diggler View Post
Cobblers
It is good engineering practice!!!

Also stainless and aluminium are a long way apart in the galvanic scale - not good!!!
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Old 12 October 2008, 06:48   #12
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Hello Codprawn.
I dontt hink the reply the poster made was to you personally, just that it is cobblers that the industry does not use the helicoil type methods. Matter of fact. I agree it WOULD be good engineering practice mate, but they dont do it in the throw away society we find ourself in. I think the bottom line is it IS no real worry, PROVIDING that you take the thing apart on a regular basis, for example, tohatsu say that the 18 I have should be stripped at 100 hours or 1 year, whichever is first. the exhaust cover removed and cleaned, the pistons decoked and the rings, now, to decoke the rings, one has to strip the powerhead. This, if accompanied by a clean and protection of the securing bolts etc will eliminate the eventual permenant seizing of the bolts into the ali.
On my towy 18, for example, at least they have thought about some of the issues, the lower leg is secured by nuts onto studs inserted into the centre section, unlike yam. That at least means that you are unscrewing ss from ss, not ss into ali. its all about cost really.
If we follow the recommended intervals of service, to the letter and more, then the problem should never arise.Use of correct anodes, even adding a few more ! is a worthwhile thing. Salt water is a total wrecker of most things. So flushing is paramount. AND regular removal and refit of fasteners. I am convinced that most outboards do NOT die of a powerhead internal failure, and even if it ever did, its simple to rebuild apart from the crank on the lower HP models without split conrods on the mains.

Rudds
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Old 12 October 2008, 10:22   #13
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Overhaulling

Quote:
Originally Posted by ruddles View Post
PROVIDING that you take the thing apart on a regular basis, for example, tohatsu say that the 18 I have should be stripped at 100 hours or 1 year,
Rudds
Rudds, although you can perform small maintenances any time between 50/100 hours use, Tohatsu recommends a full/complete engine check/overhaul each 300 hours use for any Toh 2 strokes, 2 cylinder models engine. As don't have larger than 40HP, 2 strokes engines information can't tell for the bigger ones, asume same period.

Happy Boating
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Old 06 February 2009, 13:42   #14
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anti-seize

I am using a white "ceramic anti-seize compound".
Contains no metal particle, nor grease.
It was recommended by Land & Sea for any assembly, particularly to avoid mechanical seizing/soldering of SS bolts.
I am using it on ALL SS bolts, from the smallest to ...

I did see that : a Yammy mechanic installed a 200HP on my 1st Rib, and he tightened ... well, without grease.
Too much ? For sure !
But immediately I complained that the motor was evidently too low, he had to cut 2 bolts to remove the motor ...
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Old 06 February 2009, 14:33   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirk diggler View Post
cobblers
I thought so.
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Old 07 February 2009, 04:57   #16
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We use this stuff often at work, a can of it found its way into my garage somehow. Its great stuff

http://www.dowcorning.com/home/MolykoteHome.aspx
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Old 07 February 2009, 06:27   #17
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Been using for years Lubrimatic wheel bearing grease, is extreme salt water resistant and corrosion protectant on all engine and bolts threads, will still find the product on threads after years of use, incredible for shafts, impeller housing, thermostats, cylinder head bolts. Just clean all threads with acrilic thinner or appropriate cleaning solution, dry well, apply grease and torque to specified settings. Don't know what is it made from, as it's a secret trade USA formula.
I'll second that. Also use Duckhams marine grease - I can smell it now!!!
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