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Old 18 January 2013, 08:50   #11
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Don't think elf and safety manager would approve!!!
We could put a sticker on it saying made in china

Then tell him you bought it off the internet........
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Old 18 January 2013, 09:06   #12
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For sure Jason's Cradle is one of the best systems for MOB recovery

see: Man Overboard Systems, Marine Safety Equipment, Jason's Cradle and checkout the FRC kits
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Old 18 January 2013, 11:19   #13
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At this time I do not favour a particular system. I just think currently within the workboat industry there is a tendency to have something that ticks the boxes for health and safety and conforms to the codes but is poorly sited on the boat and is un workable or will cause further injury to the casualty.
I know of 2 situations that have used cradles recently with unsatisfactory results. In one a single operator was unable to recover the casualty onboard and the other due to the conditions it was not possible to get the casualty inside the cradle.
Thankfully the casualties are alive to tell the stories in the pub
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Old 18 January 2013, 15:07   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbit555 View Post
At this time I do not favour a particular system. I just think currently within the workboat industry there is a tendency to have something that ticks the boxes for health and safety and conforms to the codes but is poorly sited on the boat and is un workable or will cause further injury to the casualty.
I know of 2 situations that have used cradles recently with unsatisfactory results. In one a single operator was unable to recover the casualty onboard and the other due to the conditions it was not possible to get the casualty inside the cradle.
Thankfully the casualties are alive to tell the stories in the pub


No point having a system with no idea how to use it!
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Old 18 January 2013, 17:26   #15
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I've never yet come across somebody floating conveniently on their back with their feet on the surface so two crew members on board and hauling them over the side with one hand under each arm works for me.

This is in an SR4 covering people wearing foam buoyancy aids and wetsuits (dinghy sailors) or just swimming trunks (swimmers or triathletes), so they're easy enough to reach and they can grab hold of the seat back for themselves, usually.

For situations when you can't reach down that far, though, the Jason's cradle does look effective, if a little disorientating. Just the thing for the lifeboat next door's Arctic 24, which sits quite high.
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Old 18 January 2013, 18:12   #16
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No point having a system with no idea how to use it!
It was not a case of not knowing how to use it but rather a single operator not being able to recover the weight of the casualty on one occasion. On the other it was a case that the sea conditions were not suitable for using a cradle. Personally I have practiced MOB drills on numerous occasions both as crew and PBI and just about all system currently available are not what I would call good systems and all have limitations.
Prevention of theMOB is the best solution so what are people's views on crew being clipped on at all times
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Old 19 January 2013, 03:46   #17
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Prevention of theMOB is the best solution so what are people's views on crew being clipped on at all times
Reduces the ability to move around freely and carry out tasks, but depending on the tasks at hand could be feasable. Howevere you would need a system that doesn't allow the deck hand to go over the side. Nothing worse than being clipped on and the boat pulling you along, especially in a commercial set up.

Lifts are the way forward, work great on dive boats both rear and side type opperated via a pully.
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Old 19 January 2013, 06:39   #18
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Basket stretcher (ferno type)
great if the casualty can get themselves in between the 4 point lifting bridle/strops,
great if the casualty needs to be airlifted straight of the boat by helo or transfered ship to ship onto a say lifeboat or a quayside onto a waiting ambulance. .

Downside for me is that they float even without the added floatation kit & unless the boat has a low freeboard & that any potential rescuer can maneuver an unconscious/disabled casualty into the stretcher before lifting ( could be tricky with say a high freeboard pilot cutter )especially if using a davit or crane .
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Old 19 January 2013, 08:57   #19
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Prevention of the MOB is the best solution so what are people's views on crew being clipped on at all times
An ounce of prevention is far better than a pound of cure - absolutely

However prevention starts with the "safety brief" - with the emphasis on the latter - ie a hand for the boat and a hand for yourself and point out the holding points. Then it requires good comms from the helm "prior" to any change in speed and direction with the helm constantly aware of their crews "disposition".

With regard to "harnesses" on a RIB - never.
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Old 19 January 2013, 11:33   #20
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what are people's views on crew being clipped on at all times
No thanks! The killcord can get in the way enough as it is, and that's only a loose connection. There's also the capsize problem — in the unlikely event, etc, I'd rather not be tied on.
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